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#deepweb | More than 200 million MGM customers could have stolen info on the black market

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

MGM RESORTS SAYS THERE WAS A DATA BREACH IN JULY 2019 — Morgan & Morgan has filed a lawsuit against MGM Resorts International over a data breach that has exposed the personal information of millions of people. The lawsuit was filed February 21, 2020 and states that in July of 2019, MGM’s computer network system was hacked. The stolen information was then posted on a closed Internet forum.

Related: Attorney files lawsuit against MGM Resorts over recent data breach

The report states more than 10.6 million MGM guests were impacted, but one of the lead attorneys said it could be much more.

“We absolutely have heard that we could be talking upwards of 200 million plus,” said Attorney Jean Martin.

She said one of their main concerns is what information was stolen. She said initially, MGM reached out to impacted customers in September of 2019, saying only names and maybe addresses had been posted online, but that information had been taken down. However in February, the lawsuit says even more personal information had been posted on an internet hacking forum, leading to prolonged risk of that stolen information spreading. Some of the information stolen included names, addresses, driver’s license numbers, passport numbers, military ID numbers, phone numbers, emails and birthdays.

“That’s what happens when your information is compromised. You never know when it’s going to go up on the web and on the dark web, when it’s going to be sold and when it’s going to be used, so now the people that have had their information compromised face this risk for the rest of their lives,” said Martin.

MGM Resorts released a statement prior to the lawsuit’s filing, and declined to give any updated information.

“Last summer, we discovered unauthorized access to a cloud server that contained a limited amount of information for certain previous guests of MGM Resorts. We are confident that no financial, payment card or password data was involved in this matter. MGM Resorts promptly notified guests potentially impacted by this incident in accordance with applicable state laws. Upon discovering the issue, the Company retained two leading cybersecurity forensics firms to assist with its internal investigation, review and remediation of the issue. At MGM Resorts, we take our responsibility to protect guest data very seriously, and we have strengthened and enhanced the security of our network to prevent this from happening again.”

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Encoding Stolen Credit Card Data on Barcodes

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Crooks are constantly dreaming up new ways to use and conceal stolen credit card data. According to the U.S. Secret Service, the latest scheme involves stolen card information embedded in barcodes affixed to phony money network rewards cards. The scammers then pay for merchandise by instructing a cashier to scan the barcode and enter the expiration date and card security code.

This phony reloadable rewards card conceals stolen credit card data written to a barcode. The barcode and other card data printed on the card have been obfuscated. Image: U.S. Secret Service.

Earlier this month, the Secret Service documented a recent fraud incident in Texas involving a counterfeit club membership card containing a barcode, and a card expiration date and CVV printed below the barcode.

“Located underneath the barcode are instructions to the cashier on the steps necessary to complete the transaction,” reads an alert the Secret Service sent to law enforcement agencies. “They instruct the cashier to select card payment, scan the barcode, then enter the expiration date and CVV. In this instance, the barcode was encoded with a VISA credit card number.”

The instructions on the phony rewards card are designed to make the cashier think it’s a payment alternative designed for use exclusively at Sam’s Club and WalMart stores. When the transaction goes through, it’s recorded as card-not-present purchase.

“This appears to be an evolution of the traditional card-not-present fraud, and early indications are linking this type of activity to criminal organizations of Asian descent,” the Secret Service memo observed.

“As a result of this emerging trend, instead of finding a large number of re-encoded credit cards during a search, a subject may only possess stickers or cards with barcodes that contain stolen card data,” the alert continues. “Additionally, the barcodes could be stored on the subject’s cell phone. If barcodes are discovered in the field, it could be beneficial to utilize a barcode scanning app to check the barcode for credit card data.”

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Krebs on Security authored by BrianKrebs. Read the original post at: https://krebsonsecurity.com/2020/02/encoding-stolen-credit-card-data-on-barcodes/

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The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Encoding Stolen Credit Card Data on Barcodes <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#cybersecurity | #infosec | WeLeakInfo, the site which sold access to passwords stolen in data breaches, is brought down by the FBI

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

FBI seizes control of WeLeakInfo.com which sold passwords stolen in data breaches

Law enforcement agencies have seized control of the domain of WeLeakInfo, a website offering cheap access to billions of personal credentials stolen from approximately 10,000 data breaches.

For as little as $2 per day, anyone could search the controversial website’s database of records and in many instances extract names, email addresses, phone numbers, and passwords. These passwords could then be used by unscrupulous hackers to break into other accounts where users had made the mistake of reusing the same credentials.

Weleakinfo

With the seizure of the WeLeakInfo.com domain, the website’s operations are effectively suspended.

Visitors to the WeLeakInfo.com website are now greeted by a message from the various law enforcement agencies who have been investigating the website’s activities.

Seized website

A 22-year-old man was arrested by police on Wednesday in Fintona, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, in connection with the website, and another 22-year-old male has been arrested by East Netherland Cyber Crime Unit (Politie) in Arnhem.

According to an NCA press release, the two individuals are suspected by police of having made profits in excess of £200,000 from the site.

Prosecutors are likely to argue that those behind the website were profiting from the unlawful sale of stolen data, and assisting third-parties in also accessing sensitive details.

It’s important to recognise that there is a clear difference between the likes of WeLeakInfo and legitimate services like Troy Hunt’s HaveIBeenPwned.

WeLeakInfo allowed anyone to scoop up the passwords of those involved in a data breach, meaning they could be used in future security breaches.

HaveIBeenPwned, on the other hand, doesn’t store or share anybody’s password – instead the service, which I heartily recommend individuals and organisations sign up for, informs you if your email address has been included in a data breach. And that’s it. The onus is then on you to take steps to protect yourself (which may mean resetting passwords, and ensuring that you are not using the password you use on the hacked website anywhere else).

Authorities say they continue to investigate WeLeakInfo, and one can’t help but wonder if there will be more arrests if the site’s customer details are extracted from the seized infrastructure.

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The post #cybersecurity | #infosec | WeLeakInfo, the site which sold access to passwords stolen in data breaches, is brought down by the FBI appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#deepweb | Stolen credit card data from Singapore banks worth more on Dark Web, Tech News & Top Stories

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Stolen credit card data from Singapore banks is valued higher on the Dark Web than that from other countries because of the robust cyber security measures protecting it and the difficulty in obtaining such data, according to new research from cyber security firm Group-IB.

The Singapore-based firm yesterday said that for cards from the United States, the average price for raw payment card data, which includes credit card number, expiration date, cardholder name and CVV number, is between US$8 (S$11) and US$10 on Dark Web shops.

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The post #deepweb | <p> Stolen credit card data from Singapore banks worth more on Dark Web, Tech News & Top Stories <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#city | #ransomware | 90pc of UK’s biggest law firms at risk of having confidential client data stolen

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Around nine in 10 of the UK’s biggest law firms are at risk of being scammed or having their clients’ confidential data stolen or compromised due to sub-standard IT security. A new study of 200 of the country’s biggest law firms found more than 90pc are […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | White-Hat Hacker Swipes 26M Stolen Credit Cards

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Data from more than 26 million credit and debit cards was stolen from BriansClub, an underground marketplace for stolen credit card information, KrebsOnSecurity reported Tuesday (Oct. 15).

The hacked records were lifted from online portals as well as brick-and-mortar retailers over the past four years. The hacked info includes almost 8 million records added to BriansClub in 2019 alone.

KrebsOnSecurity was contacted in September by someone who said he had a “full database of cards” that were either currently for sale on BriansClub or had been in the past. The site mimics the website of journalist Brian Kreb.

“All of the card data stolen from BriansClub was shared with multiple sources who work closely with financial institutions to identify and monitor or reissue cards that show up for sale in the cybercrime underground,” the article said.

According to the leaked data, card information for sale on BriansClub showed a steady increase of inventory. In 2015, the website added 1.7 million card records for sale. By 2018, the site added data for 9.2 million cards.

BriansClub mostly offers “dumps” — an unauthorized digital copy of the information contained in the magnetic strip of an active credit card — that hackers use to buy high-ticket merchandise at big box stores.

It’s not clear if any of the 26 million-plus cards for sale at BriansClub are legitimate, but cards with future expiration dates tally over 14 million.

As an average baseline, each stolen credit card is valued at $500 when prosecuting cyber thieves.

Flashpoint, a New York City-based security intelligence firm, did an “extensive analysis of the database” and said stolen card information for sale on BriansClub tallies about $414 million.

Card dumping sites like BriansClub mostly resell cards stolen by other cybercriminals who earn a percentage from each sale.

Card skimmers today are largely invisible to the eye, but many contain wireless Bluetooth technology, making it easy for thieves to wirelessly download the stolen data. These skimmers can also connect to magnetic readers and keypads to swipe authenticating information like PINs and ZIP codes.

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The post #cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | White-Hat Hacker Swipes 26M Stolen Credit Cards appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Card data stolen from black-market website BriansClub

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

In an instance of robbers getting robbed, a large underground store for buying stolen credit card data has been hacked. Cyber-security journalist Brian Kerbs has reported that data stored by BriansClub, a dubious website that shares his name, was stolen.

BriansClub hosted more than 26 million credit and debit card records pilfered from online and physical retailers over the past four years, including almost eight million records uploaded to the shop in 2019 alone.

“Multiple people who reviewed the database shared by my source confirmed that the same credit card records also could be found in a more redacted form simply by searching the BriansClub Web site with a valid, properly-funded account,” wrote Kerbs.

The cyber-security journalist complains that the fraud website has been piggybacking on the cybersecurity journalist’s online popularity to carry on their activities, even using his image in one of their ads.

Data accessed by Kerbs shows that the blackmarket website added just 1.7 million card records for sale, and added 2.89 million stolen cards in 2016, 4.9 million cards in 2017 and 9.2 million in 2018. The addition between January and August 2019 was roughly 7.6 million cards.

BriansClub holds approximately £325 million worth of stolen credit cards for sale, according to an analysis byNew York-based security intelligence firm Flashpoint.

“All of the card data stolen from BriansClub was shared with multiple sources who work closely with financial institutions to identify and monitor or reissue cards that show up for sale in the cybercrime underground,” Kerbs wrote.

“There is no honour among thieves,” noted Sam Curry, chief security officer at Cybereason. 

“The asymmetry of cyber-conflict is undeniable, and while cybercriminals and nation state attackers probe for holes at their leisure, it’s important to remember that the tables can be turned. Predator can become prey when they are successful enough,” he said.

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Local #company’s #system #hacked; employee #info #stolen

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

 Green Bay Police say they are investigating the hacking of a local corporation’s computer network, resulting in the theft of “significant amounts of money” from victims in the organization.

Police did not immediately identify the company that was attacked. Action 2 News will work to find that out.

Officers say the hackers stole human resources information.

“In this case, it appeared the cyber actors utilized a known vulnerability to access the company’s computer systems and human resources software to steal personal identifying information from employees,” reads a statement from Capt. Jeremy Muraski.

Police say the vulnerability was a known issue and a security patch had not been installed and updated.

“This incident demonstrates how vital it is to maintain public facing computer systems with the latest security patches from the server companies as cyber actors will attempt to use exploits as long as they are finding vulnerable systems,” reads the statement from Capt. Muraski.

The post Local #company's #system #hacked; employee #info #stolen appeared first on National Cyber Security .

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Stolen #identities and a #lack of #verification render #public comment #procedures #meaningless

Source: National Cyber Security News

Before implementing policy and regulatory changes, federal agencies are legally required to permit the public to comment directly to the agency. At the end of the comment period, it is customary for the agency review the comments received and, occasionally, include comments received concerning the policy change or regulation.

Prior to the Federal Communication Commission’s decision to repeal the 2015 net neutrality rules, the FCC received over 22 million comments. If that sounds like a lot, it is. So many, in fact, that it prompted a closer look by the agency. As a result of its investigation, it determined that millions of these comments were fake. According to multiple researchers, more than one million of the 22 million cumulative comments were bots that used natural language generation to artificially amplify the call to repeal net neutrality protections. On June 19, 2017, nearly 500,000 comments were submitted in a mere second and nearly all of them were identical. In fact, about 7,000 comments were submitted under the name, “The Internet” and over 400,000 of them came from Russian email addresses.

The FCC is not alone, as other agencies have received fake comments from living as well as dead Americans including the SEC, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Department of Labor (DOL).

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