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Schools are #educating #students in #cyber-security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The data-based world is well and truly upon us. All of our information is online, stored safely away by privacy companies who control the multitudes of data we entrust to Facebook, Twitter and even our mobile banking apps.

In our digitised world, data is synonymous with money. Through our stored data, businesses can work out who we are, where we live, what we do, how much we earn, who our friends are and what we desire.

Although this data can be used for good – such as tracking terror threats and increasing business transparency – there are also people who will use it for evil: cyber-attackers.

Cyber-attacks are the bank robbers of the data-sphere. If they manage to hack into your secure data, they have all the information they need to sell your data to companies, steal your identity and even steal your money.

This is why the UK has launched the £20 million (US$27 million) Cyber Discovery programme. The programme encourages 14 to 18-year-olds to engage with security problems in cyberspace to prevent a skills gap occurring as the economy develops, reports the BBC.

As the global technological industry surges forward, the need for skilled cyber-security experts also blooms. Jobs in cyber-security are expected to grow 28 percent in the next 10 years. This makes it a more promising career prospect than other computer jobs, which are predicted to increase by 10 percent, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Nicholas Coppolino, who teaches networking classes for Parkville High in Maryland, US, titled Security Plus and Network Defense, told Education Week that the challenge with teaching cyber-security is how quickly trends move on.

Coppolino says online resources such as Hacker Highschool and Cyber Aces are integral to be able to provide his students with relevant information on the ever changing cyber-security field.

Head of cyber-risk at Deloitte Phil Everson told the BBC: “There’s already significant global demand for cyber-talent across the world and there are not enough skilled people to meet that demand.

“We want to try to give the younger generation, who have grown up with the Internet, an awareness of security and its implications.”

Ian Glover, who heads the Crest organisation that certifies people who carry out security work, said: “If you can get them interested in technology that’s great, but you need to be able to describe the range of roles there are in cyber-security and the benefits of being in the industry, because it’s an awesome place to be.” 

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College IT experts and students have opposing views on cybersecurity

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

University IT teams have differing perspectives from the students they serve on the state of cybersecurity, according to a recently released infographic from CDW-G.

The IT solutions company surveyed 250 higher education IT professionals and 300 students, examining their views of cybersecurity and what students expect from their schools versus what IT professionals are able to deliver. The company released the infographic, “Securing Higher Education — It Takes Two,” at this year’s EDUCAUSE annual conference.

The most surprising statistic, according to Nicci Fagan, director of higher education at CDW-G, was that 91 percent of IT pros who experienced a data breach alerted students — but just 26 percent of students said they were aware of the attack.

Another glaring discrepancy showed that 82 percent of IT pros say they require students to engage in cybersecurity training at least once a year. However, only 35 percent of students said that was required of them.

“You have IT professionals on campus who are communicating this out to students on campus, but it’s not resonating,” Fagan said in an interview with EdScoop. “It comes down to making sure that we’re communicating through multiple channels and getting consistent feedback from the student body.”

Jordan Cohen, a student intern at CDW-G who currently attends Rutgers University, added that students get their news from multiple sources and on several platforms.

“I think there’s a major difference in channels that are being used in sending news, and channels that students are accustomed to receiving news,” Cohen said. “Rutgers does a great job of getting information out, but I think part of it is making sure they’re interacting with students — you’re not just putting it on the university website, you’re taking advantage of social media.”

Fagan said that along with shoring up communications strategies, colleges and universities also need to offer ongoing training for students and educate them about the type of cyberattacks that can occur and what they can do to minimize or prevent them.

“Just like you have students going through orientation every year … it should be part of the university’s communication plan in terms of how they’re addressing cybersecurity for their students and how students are taking accountability for their own cybersecurity,” she said.

Sixty percent of institutions have experienced a data breach in the last year, according to the research, and 29 percent have experienced data loss. The most common breaches were malware attacks, followed by phishing attempts and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.

Fagan said IT professionals are trying to combat breaches through network segmentation and advanced threat protection, among other methods.

“Universities are relying on their solution provider to offer outside penetration testing or security assessments,” she said. “They’re getting someone else’s opinion on where they might have vulnerabilities and that can be very helpful to universities as well.”

CDW-G works with about 3,000 higher education institutions across the country, and the company is a frequent presence at EDUCAUSE.

“I think exactly what we’re talking about continues to be the No. 1 issue: information security and helping customers navigate the opportunities that are out there,” Fagan said, echoing what EDUCAUSE leaders also pinpointed as the top issue in higher ed IT today.

Cohen, a history major, said he is involved with cybersecurity efforts at his school and through CDW-G because it has a direct impact on him and his peers.

“What’s really interesting about cybersecurity is it’s really the new frontier,” he said. “We’ve advanced past the Wild West stage and now we’re looking at all the new ways technology affects our lives. It’s important to protect our data, and as more and more data is stored in the cloud, I think students care about that, and, personally, I do as well.”

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A Student’s #Guide on How to Help #Protect Against #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A Student’s #Guide on How to Help #Protect Against #Identity Theft

Your college career is supposed to be about finding yourself and forging your identity—not having it stolen. But, in the United States, over 15 million consumers experienced identity fraud in 2016.

There’s a new victim of identity fraud every two seconds, according to the 2017 Fraud Study from Javelin Strategy & Research. Many of those victims could be college students.

The risk you face? A thief who steals your identity can commit crimes in your name or prevent you from getting that coveted job after graduation.

It’s smart to take steps to learn how to help protect yourself against identity theft. This guide can help. Think of it as “How to Help Protect Against Identity Theft 101.”

An identity-theft definition
What is identity theft? Identity theft occurs when someone steals your personal information — such as your name, address, Social Security number, date of birth, and more — and commits fraud in your name.

Criminals may use your personal data to take over your bank account or open new credit cards and run up debt, all while pretending to be you. They might file fake tax returns, buy or rent property, or commit a host of other crimes using your information.

As a college student, you have plenty to do without having to worry about identity theft. But, like a looming final exam, identity theft isn’t going away. Learning how to help protect yourself—and your financial future—is fast becoming a required course.

What’s in ‘A Student’s Guide’
Here’s what you’ll find in this guide:

Facts about identity theft
How students can help protect their identity
How identity theft happens—from low-tech to high-tech techniques
We’ve also included two additional sections:

A Teacher’s Guide on How to Help Protect Against Identity Theft
A Campus Police Officer’s Guide on How to Help Protect Against Identity Theft
Facts about identity theft
Here are two things you should know about identity theft: It’s big and it can affect your future.

How big? Consider these statistics:

In 2016, over 100 million hours were spent by identity fraud victims trying to resolve their issue, according to a 2017 Fraud Study from Javelin Strategy & Research.
22 percent of students found out they had been a victim of identity fraud after being denied credit or contacted by a debt collector, according to a 2015 Identity Fraud Study, released by Javelin Strategy & Research. Also, the study found students were three times more likely to be victims of identity-theft fraud than the general population.
Identity theft and your future
As for your future, you came to college to prepare for it. But if you become a victim of identity theft, you could spend hours, days, or more dealing with the mess. You also may face obstacles to starting a career and becoming financially independent.

That’s because when an identity thief commits fraud in your name, it can become part of your record. Your financial history—including an identity thief’s bogus dealings—will likely appear in your credit file. Credit bureaus store that data, and a credit file showing financial misdeeds can lead to a low credit score. A low credit score can make it hard to qualify for a variety of financial products and certain life necessities.

Lenders and other businesses typically check your credit report before deciding whether to lend you money or make other big decisions involving your future. Here are a few ways a damaged credit file can hurt you.

You may have a hard time getting approved for a credit card or loan.
You may not get a job offer from a potential employer.
You could have trouble renting an apartment.
You may be unable to get a cell phone account.
No one can prevent all identity theft. But you can take steps to help minimize the risk, and those start will helping to protect your personal information.

How students can help protect their identity
As a college student, you probably have personal information in a lot of places — in your computer, cell phone, academic file, wallet, even on the top of your desk. The goal is to protect this information.

Here’s how to help protect against identity theft from happening:

Guard your numbers. You have a lot of them — credit and debit card numbers, driver’s license number, PINs. Your Social Security number is your most valuable identifier and one of the most prized by identity thieves. Share these numbers only when absolutely necessary, and only when there’s a legitimate reason to provide them. It’s a good idea to memorize your important numbers and never leave them in plain view of someone else.

Avoid public Wi-Fi. Public Wi-Fi networks are not secure. That means that when you go to a café to do work on your computer, someone can intercept what you’re looking at on the web. That might include your email, browsing history and passwords. Your defense? It’s always smart to use a virtual private network. A VPN creates an encrypted connection between your computer and the VPN server. As a result, a nearby hacker can’t intercept your information. If you’re tempted to perform a financial transaction—like, buying something on the web—a VPN is essential.

Beware of shoulder surfing. Always be aware of your surroundings. Take time to make sure someone isn’t glancing over your shoulder while you enter your PIN number at an ATM or key in personal information into your cell phone. Think twice about providing a credit card number over the phone if someone is within listening distance.

Don’t overshare. Identity thieves often seek to bundle your personal information. What you post on social networks can be a rich source of information. Identity thieves can glean details from your life that could help answer security questions on websites—like, “Where were your born?” or “What’s your favorite food?”

Keep personal information in a safe place. It’s easy to leave a credit card or driver’s license lying on your desk. But colleges are social places. It’s hard to predict who might pass through your living space and potentially steal the information on those cards. It could be a friend, or a friend of a friend, or an out-of-town guest of your roommate.

Shred documents that contain personal information. A paper shredder may not have the same college appeal as, say, a refrigerator in your room. But it’s essential for shredding papers that include your personal information. For instance, you probably receive credit card offers in the mail. Don’t just toss them in the trash, where someone could retrieve them. Shred them right away.

Protect your computer from malware. Malware—short for malicious software—includes computer viruses and spyware. It can get installed on your computer or mobile device and you might not realize it. Identity thieves use malware to steal personal information and commit fraud. What to do? Install security software from a reputable company. It’s also essential to keep all your software programs up to date. Another precaution: Back up your information in case a hacker corrupts your computer.

Get savvy about online scams. Identity thieves may try to trick you into clicking on links that install malware on your computer. Or they might set up fake websites offering amazing “deals” to lure you into providing your credit card information. Stick with reputable websites. Never click on a link or an attachment from someone you don’t know.

Keep track of your credit history. The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act allows you to get a free credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus annually. This is where you can look to see if anyone has opened an account in your name. If you see something suspicious, you can take appropriate actions. You can get your free reports at annualcreditreport.com.

Use strong passwords on all your devices. A strong password includes letters, numbers and symbols. It’s a good idea to have separate passwords for all your devices, including computer, tablet, and cellphone. Never share your password with someone else. And remember to change it periodically. Or consider using a reputable password manager. A passport manager is a software application with strong security features that manages and stores your passwords.

Mind your bank cards. Notify your bank or credit card company if you misplace your credit or ATM card. They’ll likely cancel your card and send you a replacement with a new number. Usually they will review recent transactions with you to identify any suspicious activity. As a general rule, check your bank and credit card statements regularly to make sure all activity is legitimate.

A Teacher’s Guide to How to Help Protect Against Identity Theft
As a teacher, you could have the opportunity to help protect students from identity theft.

It’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the information in A Student’s Guide on How to Help Protect Against Identity Theft. It will help you understand how identity theft happens in college. And you can help guide students in how to minimize the risk.

A Teacher’s Guide includes a list of resources that you can share with your students to help them keep their identities safe.

Here’s a checklist of ways you can help.

Encourage students to practice smart online habits. Let students know, for instance, that not all networks on campus may be secure. If your course requires purchasing materials online, remind students to use a secure network or virtual private network (VPN). Discuss the risk of sharing personal information when students work collaboratively on projects.
Help keep your students’ numbers safe. It’s a good idea never to use a student’s Social Security number as official identifier in coursework or assignments. A student’s Social Security number is a key piece of information for identity thieves.
If appropriate, let students know there are key ways to help protect their identity. These range from checking their credit reports for suspicious accounts to never using a library or public computer to provide personal information.
Find out if your college offers any presentations or workshops on identity-theft protection. Keep a list of available resources handy.
Remind students to lock their computers and protect them with strong passwords. In general, students should never leave their computer where someone can snoop for personal information or steal it.
Point students to resources that can help provide additional information related to identity theft. Here are a few good ones:
U.S. Department of Education: Offers identity-theft prevention tips and materials.
U.S. Federal Trade Commission: Includes prevention and recovery tips. Also offers free publications in bulk.
Identity Theft Resource Center: Includes tips for students and parents.
Finally, it’s important to remind students that protecting their identities is important to their college career and future. Your identity is one of your most important assets.
A Campus Police Officer’s Guide on How to Help Protect Against Identity Theft
As a college law enforcement official, you know that your job is to keep the campus safe and secure. Helping students protect themselves against identity theft may be a crucial part of that.

Here’s a check list of things you might do:

Be familiar with A Student’s Guide to Help Protect Against Identity Theft. It will help you understand how identity theft happens in college, and how you can help students minimize the risk.
Encourage safe practices: Consider reminding students that campus theft often involves the loss of personal information—whether it involves a wallet, computer or personal documents.
Consider a policy for protecting lost devices, such as computers and cellphones that have been turned in to the campus police department. Establish a protocol for making sure the devices get back to their rightful owners.
Become an active partner in protecting against identity theft. Develop and distribute materials about what students can do avoid identity theft.
Encourage students to lock their dorm rooms or apartments when they’re away.
Point student to resources that can help provide additional information related to identity theft. Here are three good ones:
U.S. Department of Education: Offers identity-theft prevention tips and materials.
U.S. Federal Trade Commission: Includes prevention and recovery tips and facts about identity theft. Also offers free publications in bulk.
Identity Theft Resource Center: Includes tips for students and parents.

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Hack to the future: HopHacks challenges students to solve problems using technology

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

In rooms around Hodson Hall on Saturday night, clusters of students tapped away at their laptops amid a scattering of snack bags, soda cans, book bags, and belongings. Some took time out from their teamwork to study for a test. A few napped using balled up sweatshirts as pillows. It…

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I prefer ordinary girls – you know, college students….

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ I prefer ordinary girls – you know, college students, waitresses, that sort of thing. Most of the girls I go out with are just good friends. Just because I go out to the cinema with a…

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University of Washington students can hack smart devices, track body movement

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Computer science students at the University of Washington have found a way to remotely hack into people’s personal devices, such as cell phones and smart TV’s, to track individual movement, raising serious security questions, the university announced Wednesday. The hacking method uses CovertBand, a software program the student team created,…

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Parents at fault when students take guns to school, Duval County board member says

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ At least 12 times in the past school year, Duval students were caught with guns at school and half those weapons had belonged to a parent, a relative or, in one …

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Tennille Whitaker Elko County teacher arrested after 2 year sex relationships with 2 students

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ Tennille Whitaker Elko County, Nevada teacher is arrested after allegedly maintaining sexual relationships with two male students over the course of two years. Also joining the ever expanding legion of female …

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Granada Hills chaperone arrested for inappropriate contact with students

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ A school volunteer and father was arrested Monday for alleged inappropriate contact with students from a Granada Hills middle school. Hugo Paniagua is accused of inappropriate communications with students during and …

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Students learning about disabilities first-hand, prevents bullying

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ Up for a challenge? Try using a mirror to trace letters and numbers upside down, while staying within the lines. “It’s hard to do,” said one second grader to his teacher …

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