technology

now browsing by tag

 
 

Lumpkin to continue to serve on MASS – Picayune Item | #education | #technology | #training | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Special to the Item JACKSON -— Alan Lumpkin, superintendent for Pearl River County School District, is continuing his service to the Mississippi Association of School Superintendents as president of its […]

The post Lumpkin to continue to serve on MASS – Picayune Item | #education | #technology | #training | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

March 2022 — Albuquerque Public Schools | #education | #technology | #training | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Choice Check: Career-Based Learning APS students can jump-start their careers by taking classes at the Career Enrichment Center or their home schools. Career Enrichment Center  The Career Enrichment Center is an APS […]

The post March 2022 — Albuquerque Public Schools | #education | #technology | #training | #cybersecurity | #infosecurity | #hacker appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

MarTech Interview with Ramon Kania, Chief Technology Officer at Mitto | #relationshipscams | #dating | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Customer expectations have evolved over the years and more so during the Covid-19 pandemic; Ramon Kania, Chief Technology Officer at Mitto shares some industry observations and trends: _____ Welcome to […]

The post MarTech Interview with Ramon Kania, Chief Technology Officer at Mitto | #relationshipscams | #dating | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Grindr dating app removes ethnicity filter to support Black Lives Matter | Technology | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

[ad_1]

Grindr is removing an “ethnicity filter” from its dating app as part of its support for the Black Lives Matter movement, the company announced on Monday.

The controversial feature, limited to those who stump up £12.99 a month for the premium version of the app, allows users to sort search results based on reported ethnicity, height, weight and other characteristics.

In a statement posted to Instagram, the company said “We stand in solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the hundreds of thousands of queer people of color who log in to our app every day.

“We will continue to fight racism on Grindr, both through dialogue with our community and a zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech on our platform. As part of this commitment, and based on your feedback, we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.?”

Grindr’s filter had come under intense criticism over the weekend after a now-deleted tweet from the company that read “Demand Justice. #blacklivesmatter”. Many condemned the company’s show of solidarity as hollow when taken alongside the existence of a feature that allows users to explicitly discriminate based on race.

The company has long maintained that the ethnicity filter was useful for minority users who wanted to find people like themselves, rather than enforce racism.

“We decided before we were ready to pull the plug on that, it was a conversation we wanted with our user base,” Grindr’s head of communications told the Guardian in 2018. “While I believe the ethnicity filter does promote racist behaviour in the app, other minority groups use the filter because they want to quickly find other members of their minority community.”

Grindr isn’t the only dating app which allows users to filter by race, but it is by far the most prominent. Racial discrimination on the app isn’t simply enforced algorithmically, either; a 2015 study of Australian users found that 96% had seen at least one profile that included some form of racial discrimination, ‘through language such as “Not attracted to Asians.”’ One in eight of those surveyed admitted they themselves included such language.

The announcement came on the first day of Pride month, Grindr noted. “We can still come together in the spirit of Pride, but Pride this year has an added responsibility, a shifted tone, and a new priority that will be reflected in our programming – support and solidarity for queer people of color and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.”

.  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .  .   .   .   .  .  .   .  .

[ad_2]

Source link

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The post Grindr dating app removes ethnicity filter to support Black Lives Matter | Technology | #tinder | #pof | romancescams | #scams appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#hacking | UK ministers will no longer claim ‘no successful examples’ of Russian interference | Technology

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Ministers have been told they can no longer say there have been “no successful examples” of Russian disinformation affecting UK elections, after the apparent hacking of an NHS dossier seized on by Labour during the last campaign.

The dropping of the old line is the first official admission of the impact of Kremlin efforts to distort Britain’s political processes, and comes after three years of the government’s refusal to engage publicly with the threat.

Cabinet Office sources confirmed the position been quietly changed while an investigation into the alleged hacking of the 451-page cache of emails from a special adviser’s personal email account by the security services concludes.

Boris Johnson and his predecessor as prime minister, Theresa May, have both appeared reluctant to discuss Kremlin disinformation, with Johnson refusing to allow a report on Russian infiltration in the UK to be published before the election.

Versions of the “no successful examples” statement were regularly deployed in response to allegations of Russian interference in the Brexit referendum, to the frustration of MPs who believed a full investigation was necessary.

Officials said the revised position about Russian interference was set out by Earl Howe, the deputy leader of the House of Lords, in a parliamentary answer earlier this year, when he was asked if there were plans to investigate interference by foreign governments in December’s election.

The peer said the government was determined to protect the integrity of the democratic process in the UK. “As you would expect, the government examines all aspects of the electoral process following an election, including foreign interference, and that work is ongoing,” he said.

Stephen Kinnock, a Labour MP, said the government was being slow in acknowledging the disinformation threat from Russia. “From the hacking of NHS emails to the St Petersburg troll factories and bot farms, it’s clear that the Kremlin is pursuing a deliberate strategy of online disinformation and manipulation that is undermining our democracy.”

Security sources said that Russian strategy of “hack and leak” and “disinformation and misinformation” – which first came to prominence with the hack of Democratic emails in the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election that handed victory to Donald Trump – was becoming widespread internationally.

Last month, the Foreign Office said Russia’s GRU spy agency had carried out a series of “large-scale, disruptive cyber-attacks” in Georgia “in an attempt to undermine Georgia’s sovereignty, to sow discord and disrupt the lives of ordinary Georgian people”.

But despite the strong words in support of an ally in the Caucasus, ministers had been reluctant to publicly call out any Russian disinformation efforts in the UK – and there has been little public acknowledgement of the NHS hack during the election, first reported by the Guardian.

The scale of the Russian threat will be examined in the long-awaited report on Kremlin infiltration into British politics from the independent intelligence and security committee, which cannot be published until Downing Street appoints a new set of members following the election.

Earlier this week, it emerged that among those in the frame were the error-prone former transport secretary Chris Grayling and recently sacked environment minister Theresa Villiers.

The NHS emails are believed to have been hacked from an adviser’s personal Gmail account, and were disseminated online via Reddit, under the headline “Great Britain is practically standing on her knees working on a trade agreement with the US”.

Initially ignored, the documents covering six rounds of UK-US trade talks were eventually picked up by Labour from the posting and produced during a dramatic press conference by Jeremy Corbyn, who said they showed the NHS was “on the table” in the negotiations.

Following an investigation, Reddit concluded “we believe this was part of a campaign that has been reported as originating from Russia” and said it bore the hallmarks of the earlier Secondary Infektion disinformation operation, which was exposed by Facebook in 2018.

Source link

The post #hacking | UK ministers will no longer claim ‘no successful examples’ of Russian interference | Technology appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#hacking | US healthcare technology: Move to standardize APIs for patient data access receives mixed response

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans


Emma Woollacott

12 March 2020 at 15:38 UTC

Updated: 12 March 2020 at 15:42 UTC

Interoperability rules largely welcomed, but potential privacy and security issues must be addressed, experts warn

New rules giving patients better access to their medical data have been approved by the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHSS) – but experts warn that security may not be entirely sewn up.

Currently, many electronic health record contracts contain provisions that either prevent or are perceived to prevent the sharing of information related to the records in use, such as screenshots or video.

From the beginning of next year, though, health plans doing business in Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, and federal exchanges will be required to share patients’ health data.

Meanwhile, a new API will allow developers to create apps allowing patients to access their own data, as well as integrating a health plan’s information with their electronic health record (EHR).

“Delivering interoperability actually gives patients the ability to manage their healthcare the same way they manage their finances, travel, and every other component of their lives,” says Don Rucker, national coordinator for health information technology.

“This requires using modern computing standards and APIs that give patients access to their health information and give them the ability to use the tools they want to shop for and coordinate their own care on their smartphones.”

Predatory apps and snake oil warning

The new rules are generally being welcomed – with reservations.

“I’m not sure diving in headfirst by giving patients apps to access their own healthcare records via mobile apps is a good idea,” says Paul Bischoff, privacy advocate for security research firm Comparitech.com.

“Patients might not know what they’re agreeing to when handing over permission to apps to access their health records. This could lead to predatory apps that leverage medical records to sell snake oil.”

Meanwhile, says Tim Mackey, principal security strategist with the Synopsys Cybersecurity Research Center, the nature of the US’ insurance-based healthcare system means that patients may need to be careful about the information they share.

“Given the sensitive nature of medical records, and the potential for a pre-existing condition to negatively influence future patient care, vetting of both app creators and medical data usage in care decisions are concerns,” he says.

“As consumers embrace apps as a proxy for physical identification and their mobile devices as a central store for their most sensitive data, both the security of those apps and the potential for compromise of a mobile device become increasing concerns.”

Much-needed security standard

According to the DHSS, similar apps already exist, in the form of Medicare Blue Button 2.0, which allows patients to securely connect their Medicare Part A, Part B and Part D claims and other data to apps and other tools.

More than 2,770 developers from over 1,100 organizations are working in the Medicare Blue Button 2.0 sandbox, it says, and 55 organizations have applications in production.

But, says David Jemmett, CEO and founder of security firm Cerberus Sentinel, it could be hard to implement a comprehensive security standard.

“As things stand currently, you don’t know if your portal has been checked for security standards unless there has been certification to meet a number of additional standards,” he says.

“Often the code itself goes unchecked and third-party companies can be building them for the interface, but there is no one to go line by line, ensuring security standards are met to certify the software.”

READ MORE EU to give €100bn MedTech industry a security health check

Source link

The post #hacking | US healthcare technology: Move to standardize APIs for patient data access receives mixed response appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#infosec | #RSAC: Realize the Harms and Benefits of Technology and Create Policies to Enable the Public

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Speaking at the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) summit at the RSA Conference in San Francisco, Alex Stamos, adjunct professor at Stanford University’s Freeman-Spogli Institute, said that issues and decisions made by technology companies have angered people.

Stamos, who previously served as CISO of both Facebook and Yahoo, said that once he stepped out of those roles and “out of constant emergencies” he could see the bigger picture.

He said that “tradeoffs from a policy perspective are poorly understood by the public and usually go back to the engineering adage of do you want it done correctly, cheaply, or quickly—pick 1 of 3.” Stamos said that this is a basic problem of society, as people say that they don’t want companies looking at their data, but to stop bad things happening you need to see bad things. “Politicians say companies have to find the bad guys, but you cannot have two things.”

Another issue Stamos highlighted is the balance that technology companies have for “solving societal ills,” as he pointed out that technology companies provide platforms while “every bad thing [that] happened [was] done by people.”

He said that companies have to “embrace transparency and make decisions in a transparent manner.” However, the line has to be drawn around bullying and harassment, as “nothing has changed since the last election.”

Stamos said that Google, Facebook, and Twitter came up with policies on political advertising “in closed rooms with no transparency,” and these will be the rules that the 2020 election will be fought on.

He recommended that the tech industry adopt a regulatory framework similar to what Germany did regarding what speech is allowed online, but should consider how this can be adopted by countries with reduced democratic freedoms. “Or you end up with tech companies who are happy if they get regulated if they can make money, as most people who use the internet don’t live in democracies, or if they do, it is with reduced free speech.”

Stamos concluded by saying that we “have to realize that technology has made changes in good and bad ways” and take responsibility for that.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

#infosec #itsecurity #hacking #hacker #computerhacker #blackhat #ceh #ransomeware #maleware #ncs #nationalcybersecurityuniversity #defcon #ceh #cissp #computers #cybercrime #cybercrimes #technology #jobs #itjobs #gregorydevans #ncs #ncsv #certifiedcybercrimeconsultant #privateinvestigators #hackerspace #nationalcybersecurityawarenessmonth #hak5 #nsa #computersecurity #deepweb #nsa #cia #internationalcybersecurity #internationalcybersecurityconference #iossecurity #androidsecurity #macsecurity #windowssecurity
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Source link

The post #infosec | #RSAC: Realize the Harms and Benefits of Technology and Create Policies to Enable the Public appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#infosec | Great Britain at Odds over Police Use of Facial Recognition Technology

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Great Britain’s three nations are not in agreement over the use of facial recognition technology by police forces.

The technology, which can be legally used by police in Wales, was officially introduced by England’s Metropolitan Police Service in East London yesterday, amid a peaceful protest by Big Brother Watch. 

Use of the technology by English police forces has not been debated in parliament or approved by elected officials. 

By contrast, Police Scotland announced yesterday that its plans to roll out facial recognition technology by 2026 have been put on hold pending a wider debate about the implications of its use. 

Their decision comes in the wake of a report published on Tuesday, February 11, by a Scottish government committee, which concluded that facial recognition technology is “currently not fit for use” by Police Scotland.

The Justice Sub-Committee on Policing informed Police Scotland that the force must demonstrate the legal basis for using the technology and its compliance with human rights and data protection legislation before they can start using it.

In a report that was part of the committee’s inquiry into the advancement of the technology, the committee wrote: “The use of live facial recognition technology would be a radical departure from Police Scotland’s fundamental principle of policing by consent.”

The committee warned that the facial recognition technology was “known to discriminate against females and those from black, Asian and ethnic minority communities.”

Committee convener John Finnie said: “It is clear that this technology is in no fit state to be rolled out or indeed to assist the police with their work.

“Current live facial recognition technology throws up far too many ‘false positives’ and contains inherent biases that are known to be discriminatory.”

Police Scotland Assistant Chief Constable Duncan Sloan said it would now conduct a public consultation on the live software and keep a “watching brief on the trialling of the technology in England and Wales.”

In September 2019, Cardiff’s high court ruled that police use of automatic facial recognition technology to search for people in crowds is lawful. The technology is currently being used by South Wales police.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

#infosec #itsecurity #hacking #hacker #computerhacker #blackhat #ceh #ransomeware #maleware #ncs #nationalcybersecurityuniversity #defcon #ceh #cissp #computers #cybercrime #cybercrimes #technology #jobs #itjobs #gregorydevans #ncs #ncsv #certifiedcybercrimeconsultant #privateinvestigators #hackerspace #nationalcybersecurityawarenessmonth #hak5 #nsa #computersecurity #deepweb #nsa #cia #internationalcybersecurity #internationalcybersecurityconference #iossecurity #androidsecurity #macsecurity #windowssecurity
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Source link

The post #infosec | Great Britain at Odds over Police Use of Facial Recognition Technology appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#nationalcybersecuritymonth | Johnson will defy US and allow use of Huawei, says top security adviser | Technology

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Boris Johnson is likely to approve the use of Huawei technology in the UK’s new 5G network against the pleas of the US government, a former national security adviser has said. Sir Mark Lyall Grant, who was Theresa May’s national security adviser, said that the security […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#nationalcybersecuritymonth | Tech 2019: Our biggest technology stories

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans As 2019 splutters to a close, it’s time for our annual lookback at our most-read tech stories, and to ask: “What happened next?”. Facebook and its family of apps dominates this year’s list with four entries – it probably won’t be a surprise that none of […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com