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Does #Cyber Security Really Need #Machine Learning #Technology?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Amidst the escalating number of high-profile hacks and cyber attacks, organizations are now embracing various forms of artificial intelligence (AI) – including machine learning technology and neural networks – as a new cyber security defense mechanism. At a time when human skills and competencies appear to be overmatched, the thinking goes, machines have a nearly infinite ability to analyze threats and then respond to them in real-time.

Is machine learning really the silver bullet?
However, putting one’s faith in the ability of machines to defend entire organizations from hacker attacks and other forms of security intrusions ignores one basic fact: cyber security is an arms race, and the same weapons that are available to one side will soon be available to the other side. Put another way, the same machine learning technologies being embraced by the world’s top corporations and data scientists will soon be co-opted or adopted by the world’s top hackers.

Moreover, there is still quite a bit of work to be done before any machine learning cyber defense is fully robust. Right now, machine learning excels at certain tasks, but still needs significant human intervention to excel at others. For example, machines are extremely good at “classification,” which enables them to label and describe different types of hacker attacks. As a result, machines can differentiate between spoofing attacks, phishing attacks and other types of network intrusions.

The idea here is simple: just show a machine many different examples of hacker attacks, and they will eventually learn how to classify them very efficiently. The more raw data and data points you show machines (think of all this data as “training data”), the faster they will learn. In many ways, it is similar to the machine learning techniques used for image recognition tools – show a machine enough photos of a dog, and it will eventually be able to pick out a dog in any photo you show it.

Thus, it’s easy to see an obvious implication for machine learning and cyber security: machines can help security teams isolate the most pressing threats facing an organization and then optimize the defenses for those threats. For example, if an organization is facing a hundred different potential threats, a machine can easily sort and classify all of those threats, enabling humans to focus only on the most mission-critical of these.

The use cases of machine learning in cyber security
One of the most obvious ways to apply machine learning in cyber security involves the creation of stronger spam filters. For many organizations, a constant security threat is the ability of hackers to get inside the organization simply by sending spam emails filled with all kinds of malware. Once an employee clicks on a bad link or opens a bad attachment that makes it past conventional spam filters, it may be possible for malware to spread throughout an organization’s network.

Thus, you can immediately see why adopting machine learning for email security makes so much sense – it can provide a first layer of defense against these spam emails laden with malware. If you frame email as a “classification” problem, then machines can play an important role in sifting out the “good” emails from the “bad” emails. You simply show a machine many, many different examples of “bad” emails as well as many, many different examples of “good” emails, and it will eventually become 99.9% efficient in sorting them out (or so one common myth about machine learning goes).

Another common use case for machine learning in cyber security involves spotting irregular activity within an organization’s network traffic. For example, an unexpected surge of network activity might signal some sort of looming cyber attack (such as a DDOS attack). Or, activity in the accounts of certain employees that is out of the norm might indicate that one or more of these accounts have been compromised. Again, it matters how you frame the problem for machines: organizations must be able to show them what “normal” looks like, so that they will then be able to spot any irregular deviations from the normal state of network affairs.

Machine learning, cyber security and the enterprise
To get cyber security executives thinking more deeply on the matter (without delving too deeply into the complex data science behind machine learning), the technology research firm Gartner has proposed a PPDR model, which corresponds to the various uses of machine learning for cyber security within the enterprise:

Prediction
Prevention
Detection
Response
In short, with machine learning technology, organizations will be able to predict the occurrence of future attacks, prevent these attacks, detect potential threats, and respond appropriately. With the right machine learning algorithms, say experts, it might be possible to shield even the largest and most vulnerable organizations from cyber attacks. In the big data era, when organizations must grapple with so much data, it’s easy to see why they are turning to machines.

With that in mind, Amazon is leading the way with an application of machine learning for the cloud. At the beginning of 2017, Amazon acquired a machine learning startup, harvest.ai, for just under $20 million. The goal of the acquisition was to be able to use machine learning to search for, find and analyze changes in user behavior, key business systems and apps, in order to stop targeted attacks before any data can be stolen or compromised.

Then, in November 2017, the company’s cloud business, Amazon Web Services (AWS), unveiled a new cyber security offering based on machine learning called Amazon Guard Duty. The allure of the new offering is easy to grasp: companies with a lot of data in the cloud are especially vulnerable to hackers, and they are easy “sells” for any company that is able to promise that their cloud offerings will be safe from attack. Already, big-name companies like GE and Netflix have signed on as customers of Amazon’s new machine learning-based offering.

Clearly, there is a tremendous amount of potential for machine learning and cyber security within the enterprise. Some industry experts have estimated that, in the period from 2015-2020, companies will spend a combined $655 billion on cyber security. Other estimates have been even more aggressive, suggesting that the total could be closer to $1 trillion.

If companies are spending so much money on cyber security, though, they will want to be certain that new solutions featuring machine learning actually work. In order for machine learning to live up to the hype, it will need to offer a fully robust security solution that covers every potential vulnerability for a company – including the network itself, all endpoints (including all mobile devices), all applications and all users. That’s a tough order to fill, but plenty of organizations are now betting that machines will be up to the task.

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International #Summit on #Telecommunications,#Cloud #computing and #Wireless #Technology

General Cybersecurity Conference

 August 23 – 28, 2018 | Outram Rd, Singapore

Cybersecurity Conference Description

Telecommunications 2018 is a leading forum for Business professionals, Scientists, Professor, Directors of companies, Delegates, Industrialists, Researchers and Students in the field of Telecommunication & Wireless to exchange information on their latest research progress and with a theme “Emerging Innovation in communication and wireless technology for connecting the world” to cover almost all aspects and fields of Telecommunications, Cloud computing and Wireless Technology.

Importance and Scope

International Summit on Telecommunications, Cloud computing and Wireless Technology is organizing an outstanding Scientific Exhibition/Program and anticipates the world’s leading specialists involved in Telecommunications, Cloud computing and Wireless Technology . Your organization will benefit with excellent exposure to the leaders in Wireless and Telecommunication. You can update your knowledge about current situation of Telecommunication &Wireless Technology and receive name recognition at this 2-day event. Telecommunications 2018 is an exciting opportunity to showcase the new technology. World-renowned speakers, the most recent techniques, tactics, and the newest updates in Telecommunications, Cloud computing and Wireless Technology fields are hallmarks of this conference.

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The 4th International Conference on Engineering and Information Technology

General Cybersecurity Conference

 August 7 – 9, 2018 | Taipei, Taiwan

Cybersecurity Conference Description

International Conference on Engineering and Information Technology (ICEIT) is an international platform for researchers, scholars and practitioners to discuss interdisciplinary research and practices in the fields of Biomass & Bioenergy, Biomedical Engineering, Engineering Management, Construction Technology, Multimedia Technology, Electrical Machines and Adjustable Speed Drives and a lot more.

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International Conference of Reliable Information and Communication Technology (IRICT)

General Cybersecurity Conference

 July 23 – 24, 2018 | Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Cybersecurity Conference Description 

The conference will be held in Hotel Bangi-Putrajaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on July 23-24, 2018 and Organized by the Yemeni Scientists Research Group (YSRG) in collaboration with the Information Service Systems and Innovation Research Group (ISSIRG) in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences in Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Information Systems Department in Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP), Information Systems Department & Data Science Research Group in Taibah University (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) and School of Science & Technology in Nottingham Trent (UK). IRICT 2018 is a forum for the presentation of technological advances and research results in the fields of ICT.

The conference will bring together leading researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. We warmly welcome previous and prospected authors to submit your new research papers to IRICT 2018, and share the valuable experiences with the scientists and scholars around the world.

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Senior Manager, Information Technology (IT)

FiscalNote – Washington, DC

About the Position We’re looking for an individual to manage the continued development, implementation, and maintenance of FiscalNote’s internal network. Overseeing hardware and software procurement and management, internal security, and helpdesk support, this individual will plan for and execute our internal information technology strategy for our growing business across multiple geographies (currently including DC, NYC, Baton Rouge, and Seoul). S/he will ensure FiscalNoters work on a maximal performing network with the optimal equipment to tackle their core functions.

You Have – Functioned as an admin on Mobile Device Management software (ideally Meraki MDM) – Built some type of office network infrastructure and/or were deep in the weeds of managing one – Managed and implemented anti-virus and Data Loss Prevention (DLP) – Implemented security protocols and performed relevant internal trainings – Configured workstation and laptop operating systems with extensive experience with Apple devices – Worked with modern VoIP and A/V technologies – Managed issue tracking systems (preferably JIRA) and directly worked to troubleshoot employee issues – Built an extensive knowledge of enterprise cloud services (G-Suite preferred) – Leveraged your strong planning and organizational skills on a day-to-day basis – Developed mastery of networking principles, protocols, and documentation as well as a deep knowledge of security principles and best practices

You Will – Strategically evaluate, implement, and monitor our secure internal network – Prepare and manage the budget for information technology operations – Implement appropriate security and disaster recovery policies, and ensure relevant adherence – Evaluate and ensure ease of use around corporate communication systems, particularly VOIP and all A/V equipment – Monitor, triage, and respond to individual technical issues, as well as corporate networking issues – Manage FiscalNote’s G-Suite instance by ensuring proper account configurations for organizational units, setting up offboarding/data transfer procedures, managing mobile access of email, reviewing and strengthening permissions, etc. – Oversee deployment and management of company hardware

You Are Motivated. Detail oriented. Curious. Excited to help accelerate a rapidly growing organization’s ever-increasing need for advanced technological management and security, you delight in both getting your hands dirty to solve problems, while picking up new technologies and skillsets on the fly. You despise leaving issues unaddressed and are the type of person that will go to the moon and back to ensure loose ends are tied. Always with an eye to scaling systems, you recognize when a robust, systemic fix is better than a temporary band-aid, but you don’t hesitate to quickly triage when time is of the essence. You believe there’s always opportunity for cost and efficiency savings — understanding that shortsighted decision making can significantly curtail a company’s ability to scale. A reliable team member, you’ve got experience across software and hardware issues, and are ready to be directly responsible for an organization’s growing IT needs.

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International Workshop on Defense Technology and Security (DTS)

General Cybersecurity Conference

 July 2 – 5, 2018 | Melbourne, Australia

Cybersecurity Conference Description

DTS 2018, International Workshop on Defense Technology and Security, will be held at the Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, July 2-5, 2018. (It is organized as a workshop of the 18th International Conference on Computational Science and Its Applications (ICCSA 2018))

This workshop aims to be the premier forum for the presentation of the state of the art research work in defense technology and security areas related to the theory, policy, law, technical development, applications and experiences.

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Engineering Manager, Information Technology

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

USAA1, – Plano, TX

Purpose of Job We are seeking a talented Engineering Manager, Information Technology for our Plano, TX facility. 

IT Managers are engaged in all phases of the software development lifecycle which include; gathering and analyzing user/business system requirements, responding to outages and creating application system models.

Read More….

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Manager, IT Site Information Technology

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

WVU Healthcare – Morgantown, WV

POSITION DESCRIPTION 

JOB TITLE & CODE:
IT Site Manager (86804) 

DEPARTMENT:
Information Technology 

REPORTS TO:
AVP/Asst. CIO 

FLSA STATUS:
Exempt 

POSITION SUMMARY : Under the general 
supervision of the AVP/ACIO of IT, the IT Site Manager is responsible for the 
daily operation and support of the PC Techs, infrastructure, legacy clinical 
and business information systems of the assigned Hospitals, Clinics and 
Physician offices.

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Where #Emerging #Cybersecurity #Technology Fits in Your #Business

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Where #Emerging #Cybersecurity #Technology Fits in Your #Business

As 2017 enters the final stretch, security professionals still find themselves locked in a furious battle with hackers.

Some 80 percent of the IT and security executives surveyed for the most recent AT&T Cybersecurity Insights report said their organizations came under attack during the previous 12 months. The percentage soars to 96 percent for companies in the technology industry.

All the more reason why enterprise defenders are under acute pressure to create multiple layers of defense, detection and mitigation to withstand future attacks. But what worked in the past is no guarantee it will work in the future. This is a threat landscape that is fluid and changes from one year to the next.

Tool Up for the Long Haul

In the end, a good cyberdefense strategy depends on making hard decisions that correctly match investments against an organization’s risk profile. There’s never a one-size-fits-all solution, but the approach should start with the recognition that breaches are inevitable. Then it’s up to management to select countermeasures that will mitigate potential damage, all the while ordering steps to routinely tighten up vulnerabilities in order to reduce the risk of a devastating attack.

The stakes are as high as ever: Ponemon Institute estimates the average cost of a data breach in 2017 at $3.6 million. But in the AT&T report, 65 percent of the executives surveyed expressed confidence about their ability to handle cybersecurity challenges in the coming year.

Also, more than two-thirds (70 percent) of them said they plan to increase their investments in next-generation security technologies, including threat analytics, cloud security solutions and machine learning.

New skills will clearly be in high demand as organizations seek to deploy next-generation technologies in areas such as cloud security, data science and analytics. And as more information gets pumped out daily, artificial security intelligence will become increasingly important.

Clearly, those new tools and techniques would not only come in handy against their adversaries. They can also help bridge gaps in their cybersecurity defenses exacerbated by a nagging skills shortage. But what if they don’t have the personnel to deploy them?

Half of the organizations surveyed by AT&T indicated they plan to increase their security staffs over the next 12 months. However, talent has never been as tough to come by. The U.S. has a reported skills gap of 300,000 cybersecurity experts. The shortage is particularly evident when it comes to threat prevention, threat detection and threat analysis – three of the most important areas of any cyberdefense.

Even those organizations that lean heavily toward security technology can be hard-pressed to stay abreast of the rapid advances in security defense because of the state of the IT jobs marketplace.

In the interim, one option is to increase the use of outside consultants and managed service providers, who can provide the needed next-gen capabilities to deal with this ever-changing constellation of cyberthreats.

These specialists are able to attract top-of-the-line talent and can implement cutting-edge security technologies rapidly. They also can deploy analytics that generate deep insights about the overall threat landscape – knowledge that can be shared with all of their customers to strengthen their own defensive postures.

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IT Technology Technical Support Supervisor

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

IT Technology Technical Support Supervisor

This vacancy serves on the Executive Administration at Pride Drive in Hammond, Louisiana.

Only permanent employees of Florida Parishes Human Services Authority (FPHSA) will be considered for this vacancy.
 
Please refer to the ‘Job Specifications’ tab located at the top of the LA Careers Current Job Opportunities’ page of the Civil Service website for specific information on salary ranges, minimum qualifications and job concepts for each level.
 
No Civil Service test score is required in order to be considered for this vacancy.

To apply for this vacancy, click on the “Apply” link above and complete an electronic application which can be used for this vacancy as well as future job opportunities.  Applicants are responsible for checking the status of their application to determine where they are in the recruitment process by selecting the ‘Applications’ link after logging into their account.  Below are the most common status messages and their meanings.

Application received – Your application has been submitted successfully.

Evaluating experience – Your application is being reviewed to ensure you meet the minimum qualifications for the position.

Minimum Qualification Review – See History – Click the History link for the results of your application review.  Passing candidates will designate as “Pass”.  Failing candidates will designate as “Fail”.

Eligible for consideration – You are among a group of applicants who MAY be selected for the position.

Eligible Pending Supplemental Qualification Review – Only candidates meeting the supplemental qualification will be eligible for referral.

Referred to hiring manager for review – Your application has been delivered to the hiring manager.  You may or may not be called for an interview.

Position filled – Someone has been selected for the position.

Position canceled – The agency has decided not to fill the position.

The State of Louisiana only accepts online applications. Paper applications will not be accepted. Computer access is available at your local library, at local Louisiana Workforce Commission Business Career Solutions Centers (Download PDF reader), and at our Baton Rouge Information and Testing Office at 5825 Florida Boulevard, Room 1070, Baton Rouge, LA 70806.  If you require an ADA accommodation, please contact our office at (225) 925-1911 or Toll Free: (866) 783-5462 during business hours for additional assistance.  

(Please note:  Libraries and LWC centers cannot provide in-depth assistance to applicants with limited computer skills; therefore, we suggest that such applicants have someone with computer proficiency accompany them to these facilities to assist with the computer application process.  Also, no State Civil Service employees are housed at the libraries or LWC centers to answer specific questions about the hiring process.  Such questions should be directed to our Baton Rouge Information and Testing Office at the phone numbers above or by visiting the office on Florida Blvd. where assistance is available.  Information is also provided on our job seeker website at www.jobs.la.gov).

For additional information about this vacancy contact:
Janet Gordon, HR Director B
Florida Parishes Human Services Authority
835 Pride Drive, Suite B
Hammond, Louisiana  70401
Phone: 985-543-4333Qualifications

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
A baccalaureate degree plus four years of professional level experience in information technology or electrical engineering.
SUBSTITUTIONS:
Two years of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work will substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

Candidates without a baccalaureate degree may combine experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work and college credit to substitute for the baccalaureate degree as follows:

A maximum of 90 semester hours may be combined with experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work to substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

30 to 59 semester hours credit will substitute for six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree.

60 to 89 semester hours credit will substitute for one year of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree.

90 or more semester hours credit will substitute for one year and six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree.

College credit earned without obtaining a baccalaureate degree may be substituted for a maximum of one year and six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree. Candidates with 90 or more semester hours of credit, but without a degree, must also have at least six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work to substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

An associate degree in computer science will substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

A baccalaureate degree with twenty-four semester hours in computer science, management information systems (MIS), quantitative business analysis–computer science, electrical engineering, information systems and decision sciences, computer engineering, telecommunications, or computer information systems will substitute for one year of the required experience.
A master’s degree in the above fields will substitute for one year of the required experience.
Specialized degrees will substitute for a maximum of one year of the required experience.
NOTE:
Any college hours or degree must be from a school accredited by one of the following regional accrediting bodies: the Middle States Commission on Higher Education; the New England Association of Schools and Colleges; the Higher Learning Commission; the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities; the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
A baccalaureate degree plus four years of professional level experience in information technology or electrical engineering.

SUBSTITUTIONS:
Two years of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work will substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

Candidates without a baccalaureate degree may combine experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work and college credit to substitute for the baccalaureate degree as follows:

A maximum of 90 semester hours may be combined with experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work to substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

30 to 59 semester hours credit will substitute for six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree.
60 to 89 semester hours credit will substitute for one year of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree.
90 or more semester hours credit will substitute for one year and six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree.

College credit earned without obtaining a baccalaureate degree may be substituted for a maximum of one year and six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work towards the baccalaureate degree. Candidates with 90 or more semester hours of credit, but without a degree, must also have at least six months of experience or training in information technology or electronic technician work to substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

An associate degree in computer science will substitute for the baccalaureate degree.

Verifiable experience in computer systems programming; or in systems, database, or network enterprise system support (hardware or software level) at a Louisiana State agency as a student worker enrolled in any baccalaureate degree program will substitute for a maximum of one year of the required professional experience on a month for month basis. A letter from the agency employing the former student must be submitted with the application and retained as part of the former student worker’s record.

A baccalaureate degree with twenty-four semester hours in computer science, management information systems (MIS),  quantitative business analysis–computer science, electrical engineering, information systems and decision sciences, computer engineering, telecommunications, or computer information systems will substitute for one year of the required experience.

A master’s degree in the above fields will substitute for one year of the required experience.

Specialized degrees will substitute for a maximum of one year of the required experience.

NOTE:
Any college hours or degree must be from a school accredited by one of the following regional accrediting bodies: the Middle States Commission on Higher Education; the New England Association of Schools and Colleges; the Higher Learning Commission; the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities; the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.Job Concepts

Function of Work:
To supervise and direct the personnel and activities of a technical support section of an information technology division having department-wide impact.

Level of Work:
Supervisor.

Supervision Received:
Broad direction from higher-level Information Technology personnel.

Supervision Exercised:
Direct line over Information Technology Technical Support Specialists.

Location of Work:
May be used by all state agencies. (Individual departments may restrict assignment of these duties to the Information Technology section.)

Job Distinctions:
Differs from lower level technical support jobs by the presence of responsibility for direct line supervision of subordinate personnel.

Differs from Information Technology Technical Support Manager by absence of responsibility for managing all systems software, database and computer network activities of a data center.

Examples of Work

Supervises and directs a technical support section (e.g. software support, LAN/WAN support, enterprise network management, or data base management) by assigning work and priorities, arranging formal training for employees, approving/disapproving requests for leave, evaluating performance, and determining and enforcing standards.

Supervises the selection, acquisition, installation, modification, monitoring, and management of computer systems and/or hardware for system, database and/or (LAN/WAN/enterprise) system support.

Determines and writes standards and procedures for technical functions such as the computer environment, security, data base administration, storage management, transaction processing, performance and tuning, backup and recovery, network management, and end-user support.

Directs and oversees selection, acquisition, installation, implementation, modification, monitoring, and problem determination, resolution of vendor-supplied software and/or hardware; development of internal software systems; evaluation of user requests for technical assistance and modifications of software and hardware systems.

Directs and plans appropriate training in the usage and efficiency of installed software and hardware.

Meets and consults frequently with users, vendors and administrators to discuss and resolve goals and strategies, issues and/or problems of a complex nature.

Provides technical expertise to subordinates in the analysis, design, acquisition, and implementation of operating systems, communications and application software packages.

Consults and advises management in determining needs and developing strategy and implementation schedules.

Directs and conducts evaluation of hardware and software components which impact the delivery of services to the entire user community.

Attends and participates in professional conferences and seminars.

 

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