Theft

now browsing by tag

 
 

#deepweb | 6 reasons why you need identity theft protection

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans You only have one “you” that hackers, criminals and scammers would love to steal. We’re talking about identity theft, which is a bigger threat than you’re probably aware of. It’s estimated every two seconds there is another identity theft victim. And this type of theft often […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#infosec | Artificial Fingerprint Ring Could Combat Biometric Data Theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A cybersecurity company has teamed up with a 3D accessory designer to produce a ring that could tackle the issue of what to do if your biometric data is stolen. 

The attractive and wearable piece of jewelry features a synthetic fingerprint that can be used to unlock phones, make payments, or even access a home or office. 

Unlike the actual fingerprint of a living human, which can never be replaced if lost, the artificial biometric identifier can be erased and substituted with a new version in the event of an identity theft. 

The ring represents the collaborative efforts of cybersecurity firm Kaspersky, Swedish designer Benjamin Waye, and creative agency Archetype.

“By combining the elements of art and technology, the ring makes the person wearing it stand out from the crowd as a visionary,” said the ring’s designer, Waye.

“It is a different approach to how we wear jewelry. Usually, it is much more practical. Not only is it considered beautiful, but it has been designed with the aim of helping to solve a quite serious problem in today’s modern life. It helps preserve our uniqueness in a world where everything could otherwise be copied.”

In 2015, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) hack in the United States caused 5.6 million fingerprints to be leaked. More recently, the fingerprints of over 1 million people were discovered on a publicly accessible database used by the UK Metropolitan police, defense contractors, and banks. That is in addition to multiple examples where researchers have demonstrated proof-of-concept schemes that allow human fingerprints to be stolen with the help of digital cameras and other widely available tools.

“While the ring is just one of the possible ways to tackle the current cybersecurity problems related to biometrics, this is certainly not a silver bullet,” said Marco Preuss, director of the global research and analysis team at Kaspersky, Europe. 

“A real solution will involve creating measures and technologies that would guarantee the protection of people’s unique identities. Such a solution is yet to be developed, and the current situation surrounding the safety of biometrics is not where it needs to be.”

Although the ring is a proof-of-concept piece, it paves the way for further discussion on securing biometric data.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

#infosec #itsecurity #hacking #hacker #computerhacker #blackhat #ceh #ransomeware #maleware #ncs #nationalcybersecurityuniversity #defcon #ceh #cissp #computers #cybercrime #cybercrimes #technology #jobs #itjobs #gregorydevans #ncs #ncsv #certifiedcybercrimeconsultant #privateinvestigators #hackerspace #nationalcybersecurityawarenessmonth #hak5 #nsa #computersecurity #deepweb #nsa #cia #internationalcybersecurity #internationalcybersecurityconference #iossecurity #androidsecurity #macsecurity #windowssecurity
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Source link

The post #infosec | Artificial Fingerprint Ring Could Combat Biometric Data Theft appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

#deepweb | In new world of data breaches and dark web deals, identity theft goes mainstream: JPSO | Crime/Police

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Identity theft used to be a more complicated, hands-on racket that included mail theft, dumpster diving, scam telephone calls and emailed offers. But hackers, aided by improvements in computer technology and internet accessibility, have introduced an illicit efficiency to the crime, stealing the personal information of […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#nationalcybersecuritymonth | IRS Publishes Guidance to Help Taxpayers Fight Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Security Summit partners including the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the US tax industry, and several state tax agencies published security guidance and updated content to highlight identity theft precautions to be taken during the incoming holiday shopping season.

Individual and business taxpayers, as well as tax professionals, are advised to boost their security defenses against potential identity theft attempts that will soon surface during the holidays.

“While people are shopping online, identity thieves are trying to shoplift their sensitive information. As the holiday season and tax season approach, everyone should remember to take basic steps to protect themselves,” IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig said. 

“The Security Summit has made progress in fighting back against tax-related identity theft, but we need people to watch out for common scams that can put their financial and tax data at risk.”

Identity theft safeguards and protection measures

The US tax collection agency provides businesses with an updated ‘Security Awareness For Taxpayers’ PDF document during this month’s National Tax Security Awareness Week, ready to share with employees, clients, and customers

The Security Summit members also recommend taking the following measures to protect personal and financial information online:

• Use security software for computers and mobile phones – and keep it updated.
• Protect personal information; don’t hand it out to just anyone.
• Use strong and unique passwords for all accounts.
• Use two-factor authentication whenever possible.
• Shop only secure websites; Look for the “https” in web addresses; avoid shopping on unsecured and public WiFi in places like shopping malls.
• Routinely back up files on computers and mobile phones.

As part of the Tax Security Awareness Week, the IRS will also provide basic steps for easily recognizing email and phone scams, detecting identity theft attempts, and creating strong passwords for online accounts.

Videos with Easy Steps to Protect Your Computer and Phone and on how to Avoid Phishing Emails are also provided by the IRS and its Summit partners with additional information for taxpayers on how to augment their security.

Security plans and malware warnings

In July, the IRS issued a joint news release with the Security Summit partners to remind professional tax preparers of their obligation to have a data security plan in place with appropriate safeguards to protect sensitive taxpayer information from data theft attacks.

The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) also provides a Safeguarding Your Data Security Tip issued through the National Cyber Awareness System.

One month later, an IRS warning alerted taxpayers and tax professionals of an active IRS impersonation scam campaign that used spam emails to deliver malicious payloads.

The security guidance the IRS will share during the National Tax Security Awareness Week is designed to help both taxpayers and tax pros to defend against attacks such as those that are targeting the tax season with realistic phishing emails bundling malicious attachments.

Attackers are also known to use phone scams as observed in 2016 when they posed as IRS representants and asked their targets to extinguish outstanding debts of thousands of dollars via gift card payments.

Source link

The post #nationalcybersecuritymonth | IRS Publishes Guidance to Help Taxpayers Fight Identity Theft appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

UK #Citizens In #Danger Of #Identity Theft Due To #Negligence Towards #Cyber Security

Source: National Cyber Security News

A recent survey has found that 52% of Britons aged 18-25 are using the same password for many online services, increasing the likelihood of identity theft. It was also found that the majority had sent critical data such as bank details or passport copies and driving licences via messaging systems. Javvad Malik, Security Advocate at AlienVault commented below.

“Security training or raising awareness of best practices shouldn’t be limited to just corporate employees, rather should extend to all members of the public starting from schools.

It is important that the dangers and risks are understood by all in order to change behaviours.

On the flip side, service providers have their part to play by designing user interface in ways to encourage better security behaviour, for example, making two-factor authentication readily available and easy to understand, as well as having internal monitoring controls to detect where fraudulent or suspicious activity is taking place.”

Read More….

advertisement:

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

5 #Reasons Why a #Credit Freeze Isn’t Enough to Help Protect #Against #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security News

When a data breach happens, it’d be great if you could simply prevent identity theft with a credit freeze. The truth is, nothing can prevent identity theft, although there are things you can do to help protect against it.

Still, with identity thieves taking aim at everything from tax refunds to bank accounts, it’s worth asking the question: “Is a credit freeze a good idea?

It can be. But it may not be enough. Here’s why.

When your personal information is exposed in a data breach, you could face a greater chance of becoming a victim of identity theft. More of your information could be out there. And if it is, it might be for sale on the dark web for criminals to acquire.

Consider this statistic: You are 11 times more likely to be a victim of identity fraud if you are notified of a breach. That’s according to the 2017 Identity Theft Study by Javelin Strategy & Research.

No one wants their personal information stolen in a data breach. But if it happens to you, you’ll probably want to do whatever you can to help protect yourself against identity theft.

Read More….

advertisement:

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Top 10 #Tips to #Protect you from #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security News

Identity thieves use your personal information without your knowledge. The thief may use your name to recover debt and even commit crimes. The following tips can help you reduce the risk of becoming a victim.

  1. Protect your social security number from identity theft.

Do not carry your social security card in your wallet. If your health plan (except Medicare) or another card uses your social security number, ask for a different number from the company. For more information, see your Social Security number: Key to controlling identity theft pages.

Prompt to protect your SSN and identifiable information

  • Keep your card and any other files showing your social security number in a safe place; do not always carry your card or other documents to display your number.
  • Be careful to share your number, even if you are required; share your SSN only when absolutely necessary.

Protect your personal financial information at home and on the computer.

  • Check your credit report once a year.
  • Check your Social Security income report annually,
  • Protect your PC by using firewalls, antispam / virus software, updating security patches, and changing the password for your Internet account.

    Read More….

advertisement:

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

How #Parents Can Protect Their #Children From Infant #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

An identity thief can wreck credit scores, drain bank accounts, and cause underserved legal troubles. But the victims of identity theft aren’t always adults with established finances.

In fact, according to Robert Chappell Jr, the author of “Child Identity Theft: What Every Parent Needs to Know,” around 1.

Read More….

The post How #Parents Can Protect Their #Children From Infant #Identity Theft appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

New #identity theft #scheme: #scammers use #US Postal #Service to #steal #information

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Stepahnie Vagim says it was her quick thinking mailman who saved her from identity theft just two days before Christmas.

Mail theft victim, Stephanie Vagim said, “Apparently someone went online and requested a vacation hold under my address that wasn’t me. He didn’t recognize the name so he brought me the mail.”

In the stack, letters for lines of credit – that a scammer was itching to get their hands on.

“The JC Penny, the Kohls Community Bank. Someone could have furnished their own home brought Christmas gifts for everyone they know and all under my name.”

And Vagim says it was all executed through their USPS website. The thief filled out the “request hold mail service” form to stop deliveries to her home.

The person, according to the form, planned on picking the mail up from the post office without Vagim ever knowing.

We spoke over the phone with a USPS Postal Inspector. He says this is not the first time a crime like this has happened.

“We are seeing this we’ve had similar crimes take place in the Central Valley in the Sacramento in the Bay Area and the key is the minute you realize something is not right say something,” Jeff Fitch said.

Meantime while Vagim is warning people of this new fraudulent scheme, she is hoping the government will find a way to stop it from happening so easily.

The post New #identity theft #scheme: #scammers use #US Postal #Service to #steal #information appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures

Taking #Facebook #Quizzes Could Put You at #Risk for #Identity Theft

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

From phishing schemes to a thief pilfering your passport, there are plenty of ways to fall victim to identity theft. And now, participating in Facebook quizzes is one of them. As ABC News reports, the seemingly harmless surveys that populate your feed could wind up providing unscrupulous hackers with the answers to your online security questions.

Popular Facebook quizzes often ask users to answer a series of sharable personal questions, ranging from the name of their pet to their birth city. Some people see them as a fun way to bond with friends, or a way to make new ones. But as one local police department in Massachusetts recently noted on Facebook, many of these queries are similar—if not identical—to security questions used by banks and other institutions.

“Please be aware of some of the posts you comment on,” the Sutton Police Department in Massachusetts wrote in a cautionary message. “The posts that ask what was your first grade teacher, who was your childhood best friend, your first car, the place you [were] born, your favorite place, your first pet, where did you go on your first flight … Those are the same questions asked when setting up accounts as security questions. You are giving out the answers to your security questions without realizing it.”

Hackers can use these questions to build a profile and hack into your accounts or open lines of credit, the department said. They could also trick you into clicking on malicious links.

Experts say it’s OK to take part in a Facebook quiz, but you should never reveal certain personal facts. Take quizzes only from respected websites, and always carefully vet ones that ask for your email address to access the poll or quiz. And while you’re at it, consider steering clear of viral memes, like this one from 2017, which asked Facebook users to name memorable concerts (yet another common security question).

The post Taking #Facebook #Quizzes Could Put You at #Risk for #Identity Theft appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

View full post on National Cyber Security Ventures