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“Three in four” #councils do not #provide #mandatory #cyber security #training

Source: National Cyber Security News

Three in four local authorities do not provide mandatory cyber security training to their staff, Big Brother Watch has revealed, despite human error being a significant factor in most data breaches.

The privacy campaigners behind the research said they were concerned by their findings given the rapid accumulation of personal data by councils across the country.

The report revealed that more than a quarter of councils (114) have had their computer systems breached in the past five years and that 25 had experienced a breach that resulted in a loss of data.

More than half of those hit by a breach did not report it, the report found. However, the Freedom of Information results used to gather the data did not reveal how many of those breaches affected personal information.

Organisation are not legally required to report data breaches, but the Information Commissioner’s Office urges them to do so anyway. When GDPR comes into force in late May, firms could face significant fines if they fail to.

Jennifer Krueckeberg, lead researcher at Big Brother Watch, said she was shocked to discover that the majority of councils’ data breaches go unreported and that staff often lack basic training in cyber security.

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Top #Three #Health Care #Cybersecurity #Threats for 2018

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The medical field has undergone massive digitization in recent years with the emergence of interconnected medical devices and the broader exchange of health care information. In less than a decade, nearly all hospitals and physician offices have adopted electronic health record (EHR) systems.[i] But the adoption and investment related to cybersecurity has been slow. According to the Health Care Industry Cybersecurity Task Force, “a majority of the health care sector made financial investments in cybersecurity only in the last five years.”[ii] This expansion of digitizing critical information without an investment in cybersecurity has, in large part, led to the current environment where health care providers are easy targets for attackers. In a 2017 report, the American Medical Association found that 8 out of 10 physicians had experienced a cyberattack in practice.[iii]

In fact, 2017 introduced some of the largest and most widespread cybersecurity attacks in recent memory. The health care industry was shown to be particularly vulnerable to these threats. In 2018, health care providers should be on the watch for the following threats and should take efforts to protect against them.

Ransomware will Continue to Plague Providers
Ransomware is malware that exploits vulnerabilities in a system to encrypt or remove access from the information contained on the system. The infected system displays a message informing users that their data will not be released unless they pay the demanded ransom. Industries where access to information is critical to providing services—such as health care–are particularly targeted by such attacks.

Health care providers will remember 2017 as the year of large ransomware attacks, starting with the WannaCry ransomware attack, which spread to over 150 countries and infected more than 400,000 machines in just two days.[iv] The United Kingdom’s National Health Service was hit hardest by this attack, causing it to cancel nearly 7,000 appointments – including operations – as a direct result of the attack.[v] Hospitals here in the U.S. were also affected by this attack, including medical devices such as Bayer’s MedRad device that assists in MRI scans.[vi] WannaCry was followed by another global ransomware attack in June 2017 known as NotPetya. Several hospital systems and other health care entities were impacted by this attack, including Merck, one the U.S.’s largest pharmaceutical manufacturers.[vii] Health care providers can expect to see more of the same in 2018, as neither their vulnerabilities nor their mitigation efforts have drastically changed.

Targeting of Connected Medical Devices
The potential vulnerabilities in medical devices have long been on the radar. Successful hacks dating back to 2011 have affected a variety of medical devices, ranging from insulin pumps to pacemakers.[viii] Medical devices connected to a broader computer network have been used as easy access points for attackers to gain unauthorized entry to the network. In 2013, the Department for Homeland Security (DHS) issued a warning that 300 medical devices tested for cybersecurity vulnerabilities all failed to meet minimum standards.[ix] This warning spurred the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue recalls due to cybersecurity vulnerabilities and, in 2016, to issue cybersecurity guidance for medical devices.[x] This year, Congress took notice, and the Medical Device Cybersecurity Act of 2017 was introduced.[xi] Although the bill failed to pass, by all indications regulatory and legislative actions seeking to address this concern will continue in 2018.

In the meantime, medical devices remain extremely vulnerable. Unlike other devices that receive multiple and frequently automatic updates that may protect against certain security holes, medical device manufacturers remain slow to update their products, and the process for implementing updates may be less user friendly. Further, the fact that hospitals and similar health care entities “typically have 300-400% more medical equipment than IT devices”[xii] provides more possible targets for hackers seeking access to a provider’s networks.

Falsification of Electronic Medical Records
As an increasing number of providers deploy certain protections (backups, frequent updates, etc.) against ransomware and refuse to pay the demanded ransoms, cybercriminals undoubtedly will turn to other methods that could increase the potential harm to providers and lead to higher ransom payments. One change we may see in 2018 is the possibility that hackers, instead of making data within a medical record unavailable or encrypted, will simply change the stored data so that it is inaccurate.[xiii] If providers have no way of knowing what information in the medical record is accurate, substantial liability may arise from issuing a contraindicated prescription, amputating the incorrect leg, or being falsely alerted that a patient has flatlined. The possibility that these attacks could even more directly threaten life or safety of patients presents an opportunity for attackers to exploit and profit from ransom demands at a greater degree.

These three potential areas of cybersecurity concern, along with many others (such as mobile device and vendor security), will continue to trouble providers in 2018. As we head into the new year, health care entities should take steps to protect their information systems, the medical information they create, and the patients they serve.

The post Top #Three #Health Care #Cybersecurity #Threats for 2018 appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Three #Steps To #Protect Your #Network From #Hackers

Three #Steps To #Protect Your #Network From #HackersSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans According to a recent Technology, Media and Telecom Risk Index, c-level executives voted cyberattacks/hijacks as the fourth most pressing risk to their business. A perfect storm of legacy systems, complex hybrid networks, and the influx of data traffic is exposing vulnerabilities for hackers to not only […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

Three out of five #Americans concerned #hackers could #spy on them via their #webcam

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Three out of five Americans concerned hackers could spy on them via their webcam

Avast solutions help users control who can access their webcam to prevent unwanted spying.

In October, we conducted an online survey around webcam security awareness and found that 61% of Americans are concerned hackers could spy on them through their computer’s camera.

They have every reason to be concerned.

Tools that can hack a computer’s webcam are available on the regular web, as well as the darknet, in some cases even for free. Although many computers come with a light that indicates the webcam has been activated, tools can circumvent the light from being triggered.

The survey reveals that Americans are more aware that hackers can spy on them without activating their webcam’s indicator light compared to the global results. Globally, two in every five (40%) respondents are unaware of the threat, while two-thirds of Americans claim they know of the possibility.

Many people, like former FBI Director, James Comey, and Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerburg, cover their webcam to prevent unwanted spies from watching them. However, despite concerns being high, only 52 percent of Americans have physically covered up their computer’s webcam.

Covering webcams is a good start, but can be an inconvenience if you frequently need to use your webcam. We at Avast understand this inconvenience, which is why we give our users complete control over who can use their camera, without having to physically cover it up. – Ondrej Vlcek, CTO of Avast

Avast’s new feature, Avast Webcam Shield, which comes with Avast Premier, ends webcam spying for good by blocking malware and untrusted apps from hijacking webcams. Furthermore, users have the option of forcing all apps to ask their permission before they can access the computer’s webcam. The same feature is offered in AVG Internet Security, under a different name, Webcam Protection.

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Three month old died parents shook him to death

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ A baby boy died from severe brain damage after he was shook by his parents, a court heard. Ah’Kiell Walker, from Gloucester, was discovered freezing cold and soaking wet, with his …

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Former school teacher CLEARED of sexually assaulting a teenage girl on three occasions

A FORMER grammar school teacher has been cleared of sexually assaulting a teenage girl – on three occasions.

Colin Bell, 44, who taught at Westcliff High School for Girls, was accused of carrying out the assaults between January 1, 2013, and April 24, 2013.

Bell, of Rebels Lane, Great Wakering, denied the offences and has been acquitted by a jury at Basildon Crown Court last week.

The Echo can now report the verdict because press restrictions made in order not to prejudice a second trial Bell faced over indecent images of children have been lifted.

Following the verdict, Bell admitted a single charge of making an indecent image of a child and was handed an absolute discharge.

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Teacher Ross Mortlock, 35, from Avening pleads guilty to three offences of making indecent images of children

A TEACHER from Avening has lost his job, his home and his family after he was caught with child pornography on his computer, a court heard today.

Ross Mortlock, 35, of Cherington, near Avening was arrested as he arrived home on the day his new baby had just been born in hospital, Gloucester Crown Court was told.

He was found to have more than five hours of video of the worst Category A pornography showing sexual abuse of children on his computer as well as other less serious child pornography.

Mortlock pleaded guilty to three offences of making indecent images of children but denied that he had a sexual interest in them, his lawyer said.

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Committee Democrats Introduce Three Bills to Improve Consumer Cybersecurity

To Purchase This Product/Services, Go To The Store Link Above Or Go To http://www.become007.com/store/ Today, Democratic members of the Energy and Commerce Committee introduced three bills to update U.S. cybersecurity policies and protect consumers. In recent years, millions of Americans have had their personal data … View full post on Become007.com

Sydney lonely hearts fraudster gets three years jail for $2M swindle

THE Sydney lonely hearts fraudster who swindled about $2 million from lonely men she’d met through dating services has been sentenced to three-and-a-half years behind bars. Sanaa Derbas, 42, last year pleaded guilty to 11 fraud-related offences after tricking the seven victims into lending her money which she used to fund her gambling and cocaine habits, and to build a house. Between 2008 and 2014, the Sydney mother of four told the men she had a wealthy Egyptian grandfather but in order to receive his wire transfers she needed money for taxes, bank charges and solicitor’s fees. Read More….

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Every three hours, an online dater gets scammed

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Every three hours, an online dater gets scammed

In today’s digitally-connected world, online dating has become more popular than ever. In fact, more than 15% of American adults say they have used an online dating site or mobile app, according to the Pew Research Center. According to a …

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