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_________________________ The impact of the coronavirus worldwide has changed many aspects of everyday lives for millions. Social distancing and public safety has also changed the way we interact with one […] View full post on National Cyber Security

Forensic review underway after Twitter hack, tips to protect your accounts | #corporatesecurity | #businesssecurity | #

Twitter says a forensic review is underway. “Dr. Fraud” shared these tips on how you can avoid your accounts from being hacked: ·        Use two factor authentication ·        Super strong password ·        Lock […] View full post on National Cyber Security

Working from Home? These Tips Can Help You Adapt

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

COVID-19 means many people are doing their jobs from outside the confines of the office. That may not be as easy as it sounds.

So, you’re working from home …

For a while.

You’ve probably worked remotely before, and you’re thinking, “I’ve got this!”

Odds are, you’re mistaken. You don’t have this. That’s OK; this is an opportunity to learn new skills.

You can think of working from home much like someone moving into an entirely new environment. Your patterns of work might be optimized for working in an office, and they might not quite fit at home. You can think of this post as moving you from accommodating yourself to including yourself — reducing the friction that misspends your energy just to exist.

Now it’s time to adapt. You need to adapt, your workday needs to adapt, and your environment needs to be adapted. So what can you do? Below is some advice — take it in the spirit of unsolicited advice on self-improvement. Some of these things will work for you; some of them won’t. Many of these ideas work for me or people near me; they might or might not work for you. Give them a try, and be willing to learn and adapt.

Your Workspace
Maybe you’ve been getting by with sitting on the couch or on the floor in the corner of your bedroom. Those might be all the choices you have, but you should consider some changes:

  • Use an external monitor. One of the biggest productivity gains comes from useful screen real estate, so finding a way to get more is incredibly helpful to you. Paired with an external keyboard and mouse, you’re also on your way to better ergonomics.
  • Use a desk and a chair. Sitting on a couch for a long period is probably not healthy in a lot of ways. Can you fit in a sit/stand desk? Maybe you do need a different ergonomic choice, but make it deliberately.
  • If you can dedicate a workspace, that’s ideal. If you can’t, consider a space that you can set up at the start of the workday, then tear it back down in the evening — so you have clearly delineated boundaries of when you’re “in the office” instead of just chilling.
  • Even if you can’t dedicate a workspace, make a conscious effort to not take a meal (be it lunch, dinner, etc.) from where you are working. If you have a dedicated workspace, leave it and go to your kitchen, another room, or, if possible, outside for your meal. This should be time to mentally recharge as much as physically recharge. If you don’t have a dedicated space, still take the time to close your laptop and do something that is not work. Your brain (and your similarly stressed co-workers) will thank you.
  • Do you have a headset with a microphone to take meetings with? Gaming headsets can be an affordable and high-quality solution, or possibly Bluetooth earbuds. Anything is an improvement over just using your laptop’s speakers. But also think about how your ears might feel after multiple hours using a device you’re not familiar with. Maybe change between earbuds and a headset … or even just take a long break from videoconferencing.   
  • Wired Ethernet makes an enormous difference for videoconferencing — and for many of our other tools. Even if the cable has to get unplugged when you roll up your desk at the end of the day, this can be worth the trouble.

Your Family
There’s a good chance you’re sharing your space with other people — a partner, some children, maybe roommates. Their needs will matter, too, and it’s better for you to plan ahead with your schedules so that no one is disappointed.

  • Do you have to homeschool small children? What does your plan look like for that, and how are you trading it off with your partner?
  • Do you need to add daily household meetings to identify any issues?

Your Commute
You might be really excited about not having to waste time getting to the office because you can just hit work running. But take a moment to think about what you also do during your commute. Are you thinking about your schedule for the day? Working on a hard problem? Thinking about your kids? That’s valuable mental time, which you should consider how to keep in your day so that you can gracefully transition between parts of your life.

  • Can you go for a walk around the block (or further)?
  • Can you set aside quiet time at the start and end of your day, before you dive into email?
  • Make sure you take time for lunch. This might make a good time to check in with your colleagues in your co-working space or take quiet time for yourself. You might want to think about planning for those lunches to make sure you’re making healthy choices rather than just grabbing whatever is available.
  • Make a hard break. “Bye, kids, I’m headed to work!” can be a really powerful boundary to set.

Your Meetings
Meeting culture is very location-centric, especially when that location is your headquarters. Some of that is a product of enterprise tools (many video solutions makes it hard to see more than a few participants at once, and the slight added latency over the Internet interacts with the human desire to jump in as the next speaker), some is a product of our organizations (meetings where 80% of the attendees are physically in one place), and some is a product of habit (sitting in a circle, which then excludes the video participants). This is an opportunity to work on more-inclusive meeting structures.

  • Consider nonverbal cues for meeting participants to use to call for attention. If everyone is visible, that can be a raised hand; if that’s not the case, then a chat backchannel can help.
  • Work more on pauses between speakers. There is rarely a need to jump in instantly, and that’s often seen as a behavior that is exclusionary anyway, so this is a good opportunity to evaluate it. Past three people, a moderator helps enormously — perhaps defaulting to whomever called the meeting or wrote the agenda.
  • Consider working off a shared document with an agenda and notes so that some information flows can be faster-than-verbal. This might rely on everyone having more screen real estate.
  • Think about the lighting. You should be able to clearly see your face, which generally means lights and windows should be in front of you, not behind you. It’s always possible to learn from one call and revise or improve for the next one.
  • Thirty-minute blocks are not fundamental to the universe. You can meet for 5 minutes or 15 — and jumping from chat to a video call for 5 minutes can unlock great work for you or your colleagues.
  • As a last resort, disabling video can improve audio distortions, jitter, and latency in meetings.

Your Physical Wellness
When working from home, it can be really easy to fall into a rut with no physical activity. Perhaps you roll out of bed, grab a quick bite, and hop on a call. For a day, that’s only a little bad, but that’s a bad long-term pattern. Schedule your exercise time.

  • Maybe take that long walk at the start of your day or after lunch.
  • If you’re fortunate enough to have a treadmill or stationary cycle in your house, maybe you take a walking meeting with a colleague.
  • Look at how you can keep your body from stiffening from a lack of movement or poor ergonomics. Take stretch breaks. Take a 20-second break every 20 minutes and look out at something at least 20 feet away to prevent eyestrain. Consider how to incorporate physical wellness into your everyday routine.

(Story continues on next page.)

Andy Ellis is Akamai’s chief security officer and his mission is “making the Internet suck less.” Governing security, compliance, and safety for the planetary-scale cloud platform since 2000, he has designed many of its security products. Andy has also guided Akamai’s IT … View Full Bio

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#comptia | Google searches for coronavirus will now show you safety tips

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Searching Google for “coronavirus” will now send users to a curated search results page with resources from the World Health Organization, safety tips, and news updates, Google and the WHO announced today. This effort, which is just one of Google’s SOS Alerts, is now live. Google […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | 5 Tips for Protecting Your Tax Refund from Fraudsters

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

By South Carolina Treasurer Curtis Loftis

Benjamin Franklin once said, “Nothing is certain except death and taxes.” But just as you can count on tax time happening each year, you can be certain there will be scammers trying to steal your personal information and tax refund.

This week, January 27 – January 31, is Tax Identity Theft Awareness Week. Tax identity theft happens when someone steals your Social Security number (SSN) or other personal information to file a phony tax return and receive a refund. As an advocate for the taxpayers of South Carolina, I wanted to bring attention to this year’s observance and offer resources to help you learn more about spotting potential scams and fighting imposters’ attempts of stealing your information.

Our state was recently ranked at number five in a list by WalletHub for States With the Most Identity Theft and Fraud, highlighting the importance of taking the extra steps necessary to protect yourself and your information. To curb the threat of tax-related identity theft this filing season – and year-round – keep in mind the following tips:

#1. File your tax return early.

Oftentimes, people do not know they’re victims of tax identity theft until their return is rejected as a duplicate filing or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) notifies them via mail of suspicious activity. Filing early helps limit this risk, as it gives scammers a shorter timeframe to file a fraudulent return using your information. By filing your legitimate return early, identity thieves won’t be able to try and steal your refund later. Find information about filing options at dor.sc.gov/iit-filing.

#2. Choose your tax preparer wisely.

Most tax return preparers provide outstanding and professional tax service. However, each year, some taxpayers are hurt financially because they choose the wrong tax return preparer. If you plan to pay someone to help prepare your taxes, do diligent research in advance and choose wisely, as you’ll be sharing with them your most personal information, including details about your marriage, income, children, social security number and overall financial picture.

#3. Know the signs of an IRS imposter.

Scams take many shapes and forms, which is why it’s important to know the signs of a legitimate IRS communication and the signs of a scam. For example, there’s a common phone scam where IRS impersonators call taxpayers, saying they owe money and must pay right away. However, the real IRS does not initiate contact via phone and will never call you demanding money. By familiarizing yourself with common IRS imposter scams, you’ll empower yourself with the knowledge to thwart fraudsters’ attempts at identity theft. You can find information about recent and prevalent tax scams on the IRS website.

#4. Protect your personal information.

You can only control what happens to your personal information as long as it’s in your possession. Be diligent in storing documents that contain sensitive financial information in a secured location. Once you no longer need them, shred them. Use the IRS publication Security Awareness for Taxpayers as a reference for additional steps you can take to protect yourself from identity thieves.

#5. Ensure your computer is protected.

The South Carolina Department of Revenue (SCDOR) recommends filing online using a reputable provider – it’s fast, accurate, and secure. But you still need to be proactive about protect your information by ensuring your computer is protected. When dealing with financial or sensitive information, only use secure, protected Wi-Fi networks – never public Wi-Fi networks – and only give personal information over encrypted websites, which you can identify by the “https” web address prefix. Utilize the SCDOR Cyber Security Awareness resource center, which offers pertinent information about protecting yourself online.

Curtis Loftis is the South Carolina State Treasurer. As Treasurer, he is the state’s “private banker,” managing, investing and retaining custody of nearly $50 billion in public funds.

If you believe your information has been compromised, you can contact the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit at 1-800-908-4490, or visit IdentityTheft.gov.

The South Carolina Department of Revenue (SCDOR) is the state agency responsible for the administration and regulation of tax laws in South Carolina. If you suspect or know of an individual or company that has committed tax fraud in South Carolina, or if you think you may be a victim of identity theft that has led or could lead to tax fraud, you can file a report with the SCDOR at dor.sc.gov/report-tax-fraud. For information and helpful resources about Income Tax in South Carolina, visit dor.sc.gov/iit.

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Tips to help you outsmart scammers in 2020

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans GREEN BAY, Wis. (WBAY) – A new year, a new push to protect your privacy. Consumer First Alert wants to help you outsmart scammers in 2020. The Better Business Bureau of Wisconsin has released its list of New Year’s Resolutions for a Consumer-Savvy 2020. Here’s the […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

5 Tips for Keeping Your Security Team on Target

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans In nearly every security environment, competing priorities are a constant battleground. Here’s how to keep the focus on what’s important. When I sit down to write an article, I encounter any number of distractions. Each distraction seems to want nothing more than to keep me from […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

4 Tips to Run Fast in the Face of Digital …

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

This gridiron-inspired advice will guarantee your digital transformation success and keep your data safe.

Unlike the 16-game NFL season, for the eight in 10 companies in the US undergoing digital transformation (DX), there’s no off-season. The journey is an ongoing one that, for IT leaders, can feel like an endurance challenge, not to mention a massive expense, with DX spending predicted to reach nearly $2 trillion in 2022, according to IDC.

Application-centric visibility is key to accelerating DX. By better visualizing, isolating, and understanding application interaction and usage patterns, organizations can accelerate secure deployment of their digital applications and prompt touchdown dances for DX victories both small and large along the way. I mean, who doesn’t want to see a SecOps team do the Ickey Shuffle?

But getting there requires adapting to the speed of the game, or transforming rapidly, which isn’t an easy feat when DX involves complexities like public, private, and hybrid cloud infrastructure and a new breed of multitier applications need to be managed and secured. Much like a wide receiver making plays in double coverage, networking pros have to be able to run fast networks during DX while navigating everything from changing IT environments to regulatory challenges like the General Data Protection Regulation and security demands in the context of escalating cybercrime.

Here are four gridiron-inspired tips that can help see your way to DX success with data, guaranteeing a SecOps Gronk spike:

1. Create a championship culture from top to bottom.
Organizations can take a cue from great sports franchises that develop and maintain a winning culture. Digital transformation is a business imperative and, much like winning, is built on strong technology underpinnings, ultimately focused on driving the culture of the organization. It starts at the board and C-level team with a vision of what you want the company to be in five years and then determining whether or not you have the culture, people, and resources to get there. You have to deliberately become a data-driven culture in every aspect from top to bottom, and treat cybersecurity as a strategic business enabler rather than an obstacle, in order to win at DX.

2. See everything, all the time. 
Whether we’re talking turf or network, clear visibility of the traffic is just as important as any other technical skills. Like a pass rusher on the quarterback’s blind side, malware moves and data exfiltration happens across the network in stealth mode — not to mention the complexity of applications operating on-premises, in the cloud, or both. Having a clear line of sight into the organization’s network and application layers lets you visualize your infrastructure, what’s running on it, and how applications are performing and interacting with each other — and from there, extract kernels of insight to guide your DX efforts.

3. Handle complex schemes at top speeds.
Getting 53 professional athletes to master an NFL playbook comes with its challenges, not unlike wrangling the new breed of digital applications. Both require turning complexity into cohesion — and doing so fast. I’m referring to applications with multiple tiers (where each tier is scaled out and there’s a set of microservices), some of which are built in-house, others are built externally, and some come from open source. When the components are sandwiched together, complexity escalates rapidly, which ultimately manifests itself as challenges around securing the applications, as well as ensuring consistent performance and experience. The key to keeping things under control is having the right kind of data to help you understand the interaction, performance, and security characteristics of these applications.

4. Be a good halftime coach.
Good coaches make quick adjustments to position the team for second-half success. NetOps and SecOps teams can relate when it comes to troubleshooting, managing, and securing applications. Whatever the application architecture, once in deployment something at some point is bound to go awry. You need to figure out what’s happening and quickly course correct, but when you’re scaling microservices, it’s hard to troubleshoot just through application instrumentation. By analyzing the network traffic pertaining to these applications, you get immediate actionable data points that can be used to address trouble spots and understand security implications as well. The ability to isolate specific applications or microservices communication streams for deeper inspection would allow the security operations to easily understand access patterns and put in place effective micro segmentation strategies.

The NFL game is faster than ever, and the same can be said for the pace of digital business and the proliferation of cyber threats. The ability to the handle day-to-day challenges while positioning the organization for future success is only possible with the appropriate infrastructure in place. NetOps and SecOps teams are tasked with the development, implementation, maintenance, and security of very complex enterprise infrastructures that prepare their organization for tomorrow, much like NFL teams must draft and develop players for future success. Both must do so while reducing risks, costs, and security threats along the way. With the above-mentioned tips as the foundation of your journey, you can position your organization for success for seasons to come.

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Shane Buckley is President and Chief Operating Officer of Gigamon with responsibility for expanding the company’s business and markets worldwide. He brings more than 20 years of executive management experience to the team and joins Gigamon from Xirrus where he was CEO prior … View Full Bio

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Tips for Brits to stay Secure on Black Friday

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans As Brits plan to go to extreme lengths to grab a bargain this Black Friday but are leaving themselves exposed to cyber-criminals? Brits are gearing up to grab a bargain this Black Friday and Cyber Monday, with 17% already considering pulling a sickie. Over half of […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | These 4 Tips Will Make You Fluent in Cyber Risk

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Understanding the Security Gap
According to a recent report by the Advanced Cyber Security Center, 91% of organizations…

The post These 4 Tips Will Make You Fluent in Cyber Risk appeared first on ZeroNorth.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Blog | ZeroNorth authored by ZeroNorth. Read the original post at: https://www.zeronorth.io/blog/these-4-tips-will-make-you-fluent-in-cyber-risk/

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