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#datingadvice | Gotham Gold Picks – Warning! Se*ually Frustrated Women Want YOU For Lockdown S*x-Fest! | romancescams | #scams

_________________________ You’re Going To Discover… The 3 most important “Interest Signals” that a girl will send you (often subconsciously) when she likes you and exactly what to do when you […] View full post on National Cyber Security

WhatsApp “Martinelli” hoax is back, warning about “Dance of the Pope” – Naked Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

If you follow @NakedSecurity on Twitter, you’ll have noticed that we warned last week about an old WhatsApp hoax that suddenly reappeared.

The bogus news is generally known as the “Martinelli hoax”, because it starts like this:

If you know anyone using WhatsApp you might pass on this. An IT colleague has advised that a video comes out tomorrow from WhatsApp called martinelli do not open it , it hacks your phone and nothing will fix it. Spread the word.

When we last wrote about “Martinelli”, back in 2018, we noted that the hoax was given a breath of believability because the text above was immediately followed by this:

If you receive a message to update the WhatsApp to WhatsApp Gold, do not click!!!!!

This part of the hoax has a ring of truth to it.

Back in 2016, hoax-checking site Snopes reported that malware dubbing itself WhatsApp Gold, was doing the rounds.

The fake WhatsApp was promoted by bogus messages that claimed, “Hey Finally Secret WhatsApp golden version has been leaked, This version is used only by big celebrities. Now we can use it too.”

So WhatsApp Gold was actual malware, and the advice to avoid it was valid, so the initiator of the Martinelli hoax used it to give an element of legitimacy to their otherwise fake warning about the video.

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Warning as bogus KCOM workers target Hull homes in new ‘spoofing’ scam

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Several people have been preyed on by bogus callers claiming to work for a major communications company.

The fraudsters have been targeting homes in the region posing as staff from KCOM in order to con unsuspecting individuals into handing over banking information.

The calls have been showing as local numbers in the practice known as “spoofing” but the IT provider made clear that they never ask individuals for card details.

A spokesperson for KCOM urged customers to be vigilant and said: “We’ve been made aware of a spate of scam calls recently from people posing as KCOM, calling from what appear to be local Hull phone numbers.

“This is known as ‘spoofing’ where the scammer can make it look as if they are calling from a 01482 number when in reality they are probably calling from abroad.

Watch: How to protect yourself from text message and cold call scams

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“We have already blocked several numbers that have been reported to us by our customers. Fortunately, those customers we’ve spoken to have realised something is not quite right and ended the call – and have avoided losing money as a result.

“If you’re ever suspicious about a call, we recommend you hang up immediately and call us to check. Never give out any personal information or bank details and never allow anyone to take remote control of your computer.

“We never ask for customers’ credit or debit card details over the phone and will always transfer customers who wish to make a payment over to our secure, automated payment line.

“As well as calling KCOM on 01482 602555 anyone who believes they have been targeted by a scam caller should report it to Action Fraud, the National Fraud and Cyber Crime Reporting Centre, by calling 0300 123 2040 or by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.”

Providing Action Fraud with this information enables it to track and fight cyber crime.

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#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Mobile phone scam warning – reminder to just hang up

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans If you receive a phone call from anyone claiming to be an employee of an online shopping site or ‘buy first – pay later’ business advising you there are issues associated with your account – just hang up and contact the company using an independently verified […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

A Handy Chrome Feature, a Sonos Update Warning, and More News

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Chrome is protecting and Sonos is disconnecting, but first: a cartoon about the new big screen. Here’s the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday? Sign up here! Today’s News Don’t ignore […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com

Malicious npm package taken down after Microsoft warning – Naked Security

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Criminals have been caught trying to sneak a malicious package on to the popular Node.js platform npm (Node Package Manager).

The problem package, 1337qq-js, was uploaded to npm on 31 December, after which it was downloaded at least 32 times according to figures from npm-stat.

According to a security advisory announcing its removal, the package’s suspicious behaviour was first noticed by Microsoft’s Vulnerability Research team, which reported it to npm on 13 January 2020:

The package exfiltrates sensitive information through install scripts. It targets UNIX systems.

The data it steals includes:

  • Environment variables
  • Running processes
  • /etc/hosts
  • uname -a
  • npmrc file

Any of these could lead to trouble, especially the theft of environment variables which can include API tokens and, in some cases, hardcoded passwords.

Anyone unlucky enough to have downloaded this will need to rotate those as a matter of urgency in addition to de-installing 1337qq-js itself.

#cyberfraud | #cybercriminals | Alpharetta Warning Public About Online Dating Scams, Threats

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

ALPHARETTA, GA — The City of Alpharetta is warning the public to be cautious when using online dating websites after a citizen was recently blackmailed.

The Alpharetta Department of Public Safety recently took a report from a citizen who was using a dating app and made a decision to send intimate pictures to the person they connected with, the city said.

“The victim has now paid thousands of dollars to the person to keep those pictures off social media channels,” the city said. “The perpetrator, in this case, has not gone away and continues to threaten and demand more money from the victim.”

Cyber dating and the apps that make it possible attracts millions of people. Many in search of companionship, many seeking long-term relationships, and many seeking to steal identities or worse, the city said. The world of online dating is fraught with top-of-mind risks (Is that photo really the person I’m talking to? Could this person be a predator?), but there is also a growing list of concerns related to data privacy.

“The fact is, dating sites and apps have a history of being hacked,” Alpharetta said. “For example, in 2018 BeautifulPeople.com was hacked and the responsible cyber criminals sold the data of 1.1 million users, including personal habits, weight, height, eye color, job, education and more, online. In early 2019 detailed user records of more than 42 million dating app users were found on a Chinese database that was not even protected by a password. The user records found on the data base contained everything from IP addresses and geo-locations to ages and usernames, giving potential hackers plenty of information to take advantage of.”

But, there are also many stories of people who found each other via online dating apps and are in very happy relationships today, Alpharetta wrote. So, the city said it does not want to scare any adult away from using them. The city said it wants everyone to be safe with their online dating activities.

With that in mind, here are a few tips that the city encourages all online daters to use:

Account Security

As with all of your Internet accounts, use a strong, unique password and two-factor authentication, if it’s available.

Beware of anyone sending you links, and especially links using shortened URLs. Hackers will try to lure you away from the dating app to sites that can more easily harvest your data. This is one of the most common Tinder scams. Rest your cursor over any link before you click it to see the address.

Only ever access your dating app on a secure WiFi network. An even better option is to protect the Internet connection of your dating app with a trustworthy VPN. This will add an extra layer of security to the app’s encryption.

Privacy And Social Engineering

Never share your full name, address, or place of work in your profile. Tinder, Bumble and Happn all allow users to add information about their job and education. With just this information and a first name, Kaspersky researchers were able to match a dating app profile to a LinkedIn or Facebook account 60 percent of the time.

Do not link your account on a dating app to your Facebook account. This makes it easier for hackers to connect your social media profile to your online dating one. It also would expose your data if Facebook were to suffer a data breach.

Using the same logic, do not link your Instagram, Twitter, or WhatsApp accounts to your dating app or share them in your profile.

For accounts or relationships based on your email, don’t use your everyday email address. Instead, get a separate, anonymous email just for that specific app or relationship.

Always disable any location-sharing features in your accounts on dating apps.

If you are uncomfortable sharing your cell phone number with someone you just met online, there are services that allow you to create a separate phone number. These services give you temporary phone numbers that last a couple of weeks for free or for a small fee. Since they are temporary, it is hard to use such a phone number on your dating app account, but it could give you some time to meet your matches in real life before you trust them with your phone number.

If an account looks suspicious, try doing a reverse image search of the profile pictures. If your search finds the photo is from a modeling agency or a foreign celebrity, you are likely looking at a fake account.

Eventually, you will have to share information about yourself. You are trying to convince someone that you are interesting enough to meet. Try to talk more about your interests, ambitions, and preferences and avoid specific information that could identify you. More “I love pizza” than “My favorite pizza restaurant is on the corner of Main St. and 2nd Ave.” Never be afraid to say “no” if someone asks you for personal information that you’re not yet comfortable sharing.

Avoid sending digital photos to users you do not trust. Digital photos can contain metadata about when and where the photo was taken along with other information that could be used to identify you. If you must share a photo, be sure to remove its metadata first. Also, always keep in mind that any explicit pictures you send could be used for blackmail.

If you are chatting with someone and they are responding incredibly fast or if their responses seem stilted and full of non-sequitur questions, you should proceed carefully. While it is possible you have enchanted someone so thoroughly that they are struggling to respond coherently, it is more likely you are chatting with a bot. Online bots are getting harder and harder to detect, but one test you can try is to work gibberish into a phrase, like “I love a;lkjasdllkjf,” and see if the bot repeats the non-word or transitions into a non-sequitur question. (If it’s a human, you can always cover by saying your phone slipped.)

This may seem obvious, but if someone asks you over a dating app to send them money, your answer should always be “No.”

Do not immediately friend your matches on Facebook. Once someone has access to your Facebook account, they can see your friend and family network along with your past activity and location. Wait until you have been dating for a month or two before friending them.

Physical Safety

Have a mutual understanding of boundaries. No matter what kind of date you have planned, it is always safer to know exactly what you’ll be doing. By discussing a plan beforehand, you can both go into the situation knowing what you are and aren’t comfortable with.

Meet in a public place first. No matter what kind of date you’re going on, it is always safer to meet in an open and public place first. Avoid meetings that take place in remote areas, vehicles or anywhere that makes you feel uncomfortable.

Always let someone know where you are. Before meeting up with someone, let a friend or family member know where you’ll be. Some apps let you share your location with others so that someone can keep an eye on you during your date.

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Cybercrime #warning for #homes and #businesses

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

BUSINESSES and households around the region have been warned about the growing danger of cybercrime.

The rise of the internet has led to the potential impact of cyber-theft, cyber-vandalism and even cyber-extortion increasing dramatically, with experts warning that the more we rely on the net, the more potentially vulnerable we become.

Mark Hughes, chief executive of BT Security, said it was “a daunting thought” that there are now about 27 billion devices connected to the internet, more than three times the human population of the world, and that this figure was expected to reach 125 billion by 2030.

Mr Hughes said: “If you think this issue doesn’t affect you and that it is a mainly a matter for governments and large organisations, then think again.

“There are growing indications that small and medium businesses, the bedrock of a regional economy such as the one in Yorkshire and the Humber, are increasingly in the firing line of the criminals, and research indicates that many are unprepared to meet this threat. Research by Accenture showed that 55 per cent of British workers can’t recall receiving cyber security training, whilst one in five weren’t sure they could identify a phishing email – a common method used by cyber criminals to raid personal bank accounts.”

Mr Hughes said BT security team detect 100,000 unique malware samples every day – more than one per second – and protect the BT network against more than 4,000 cyber-attacks daily.

He urged all homes and businesses to take steps to protect themselves from cyber attacks, including updating anti-virus software regularly, installing any patches recommended by the software, investing in regular cyber security training for staff, and reminding staff to be wary of opening suspicious emails or links.

The post Cybercrime #warning for #homes and #businesses appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Siemens to update medical scanner software amid Homeland Security warning machines could be hacked

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

German industrial group Siemens expects to update software in some of its medical scanners by the end of the month to deal with vulnerabilities that could, in theory, allow some of this equipment to be hacked, a company spokesman said on Monday. Last week, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security…

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Apple issues cyber warning for iPhone users, issues security patch

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Apple issued a new warning after a new hacking threat. The tech giant says there is a new cyber threat, but has taken steps to thwart the attack. FOX Business Network’s Tracee Carrasco reports, “Apple has now issued a critical security patch for all iOS devices and for Mac computers…

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