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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Secure Developer Workstations Without Slowing Them Down

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Fueled by automation, the adoption of DevOps processes and more, the role of the developer has become increasingly important and widespread for enterprises going through digital transformation. Developers need access to privileged credentials in order to access key developer tools like Kubernetes or Jenkins admin console. These credentials can be saved locally, making developers’ workstations — whether they are Macs or PCs — high-value targets for hackers.

These workstations are often vulnerable to something as simple as a phishing email, which attackers can use as an entry point to get access to the developer’s credentials. Because of these vulnerabilities, developers’ workstations are extremely important to secure. However, developers are famous for prizing speed above all else — and seeing security as little more than a speed bump.  So how to ensure that developers take security seriously?

Securing privileged access through the principle of least privilege needs to be a top security priority. It is no secret that no-one should have full-time admin rights. But, what does that mean for developers?

Security teams face a difficult dilemma. They need to better secure developer workstations while still providing them the elevated permissions and privileges—and freedom—they need to get their job done. And they need to do all that without impacting velocity.

I recently encountered this comment on the Stackoverflow forum:

 “There is almost no legitimate operational reason for restricting admin access to local PCs for staff that need it to do their job.”

Is that true?

Developers, DevOps and other engineers all perform administrative tasks as part of their job responsibilities, so they also have “full control” of their environment. Furthermore, because of the work developers do, there are extra challenges involved in hardening and restraining their workstations regardless of whether they are using Windows or macOS.

Developers install and uninstall software, drivers and system updates. They change operating system internals and use debugging programs on a regular basis. Without full control, developers often can’t do their jobs.

However, developers have access to source code, API keys and other shared secrets – usually more access than the standard user. Compromising a developer is a quick way for attackers to gain immediate elevated access to the most essential, mission-critical information an organization has. Consequently, developers have the kind of access that attackers want, which makes them the type of user who needs the highest levels of protection – whether they like it or not.

Want to take over a company or cause reputational damage quickly? Compromise a developer endpoint.

There are even specific types of attacks designed to target developers.  For instance, “watering hole” attacks where cyber attackers will compromise common, popular developer web sites known to be good places to share code and get help troubleshooting programming issues. For example, four of the largest software developer companies in the world were compromised during a single cyber attack campaign that placed a zero-day Java exploit on an iOS developer web site.

Rights and Responsibilities

One way to deal with developers’ requests for full admin rights would be to provide them with virtual machines dedicated to programming, which could be perfectly patched and thoroughly hardened. This is doable with the right amount of monitoring and alerting, antimalware and IPS.

However, a workaround like this has a huge management overhead. It requires more budget, additional machines and another user to manage those machines.  It’s not a comfortable situation for the IT team or the developer – and let’s not forget the cost of such a solution.

Additionally, while using their development tools, developers consume a lot of computer resources (e.g. generating millions of temporary files during code compilation). This leaves the security team with the job of ensuring that no significant performance impact occurs while implementing endpoint security products – not an easy task.

Conventional attempts to counter this typically require system administrators or security staff to perform manual inspections and craft security policies in response. As application complexity and development velocity increase, it becomes impractical to determine least privilege ahead of time manually. Furthermore, a central policy gatekeeper won’t scale efficiently and is likely to negatively impact delivery velocity.

Cutting the Gordian Knot

There has to be a better way to balance the needs of the developer with security concerns. Organizations need to be able to remove administrative privileges from developers without preventing them from doing their jobs, reducing velocity or overburdening security teams.

CyberArk Endpoint Privilege Manager can overcome these obstacles, allowing organizations to remove privileged credential rights on Windows workstations, servers and MacOS. It provides privileged access management (PAM), allowing enterprises to easily remove local Admin users – including developers. For instance, CyberArk Endpoint Privilege Manager can elevate specific applications used by the developer on a day-to-day basis or provide just-in-time user elevation for a specified time while recording and logging all user activity.

In addition, since developers may save credentials to their development environments, Endpoint Privilege Manager protects those repositories from credential theft while allowing trusted applications to use the credential stores.

Another key feature for the developers use-case is the out-of-the-box predefined policies for different developer tools like visual studio, Eclipse, Git and others.

Final Thought – The Developer Resistance

Each new security-driven restriction impacts the developer productivity throughout the entire software development process. Consequently, developers may fight the rules and restrictions necessary to maintain a strong security posture. What makes Endpoint Privilege Manager any different?

Endpoint Privilege Manager minimizes interference in the developer workflow. Developers – and other users – don’t need to go through the extra step of involving an administrator when they need access to certain applications. For a predefined, approved set of applications, users can seamlessly gain access through an automated process.

Furthermore, Endpoint Privilege Manager allows users to elevate privileges to access these approved applications while continuing to access other, unapproved applications as non-privileged users. This means that developers can continue to access the majority of the applications they use on a  daily basis without having to slow down – without losing out on the benefits of application security.

Developers are like builders constructing a house on an empty lot. They need to be armed with the best tools to do their best work. If you give them old equipment, they will spend more time working around it than actually building. Endpoint Privilege Manager lets developers do what they do best – without interrupting their workflow with compliance and security requirements – so that they can write code faster.

Developers don’t need to be the last hold out for administrator rights within an organization. Learn how this is possible today.

The post Secure Developer Workstations Without Slowing Them Down appeared first on CyberArk.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from CyberArk authored by Vadim Sedletsky. Read the original post at: https://www.cyberark.com/blog/secure-developer-workstations-without-slowing-them-down/

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#cybersecurity | #hackerspace | Active Directory Without a Server

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

What Does Active Directory’s Server Do? Active Directory® (AD) is a directory service introduced by Microsoft® that runs on a Windows® server to manage user access to networked resources. The server role in Active Directory is run by Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), and the server running AD DS is called a domain controller. […]

The post Active Directory Without a Server appeared first on JumpCloud.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Blog – JumpCloud authored by Kayla Coco-Stotts. Read the original post at: https://jumpcloud.com/blog/active-directory-without-a-server/

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The post #cybersecurity | #hackerspace |<p> Active Directory Without a Server <p> appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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Your computer could be infected without you knowing it: Here’s how to find out

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Until you become the target of data theft, a malware attack is only what you read about in the news. Yet there is a big possibility that malware keeps hiding in your system for a long time without you being aware of it. Theft of data or money is not…

The post Your computer could be infected without you knowing it: Here’s how to find out appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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Voting machines can be hacked without a trace of evidence

Voting machines can be hacked without a trace of evidenceSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans The country’s voting machines are susceptible to hacking, which could be done in a way so that it leaves no fingerprints, making it impossible to know whether the outcome was changed, computer experts told President Trump’s voter integrity commission Tuesday. The testimony marked a departure for […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

App lets hackers develop Android ransomware without code

more information on sonyhack from leading cyber security expertsSource: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans Creating malware isn’t rocket science anymore. Unlike those old-school hackers, who had to write their own malicious code and run them to hack someone’s computer, all the new hackers need is an Android device. Yes, you’ve read it right. Now, there’s a new Android app that […] View full post on AmIHackerProof.com | Can You Be Hacked?

6 Changes To Make In Your Dating Life During App-less April, A Month Without Dating Apps

Whether dating apps are causing a “dating apocalypse” or are merely the easiest way to get a date, there’s no denying these tools have been total gamechangers in the dating scene within the last few years. And even though dating apps are most popular among millennials, according to a recent Bustle survey with dating app Happn of over 1,000 dating app users, 78 percent of women and 85 percent of men still want to meet people IRL. Read More….

The post 6 Changes To Make In Your Dating Life During App-less April, A Month Without Dating Apps appeared first on Dating Scams 101.

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3 Ways to Juice Up Your Online Dating Profile Without Lying

Wait! Before you decide to tell a white lie on your online dating profile, consider this: When you meet in person for the first time, that person will not trust you about anything moving forward. I know you think uploading pictures from 10 years ago when you looked really good in that blue dress won’t matter, but to the savvy online dater who has already been through a string of bad dates, you misrepresenting yourself can instantly ruin your chances at a relationship. Read More….

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How Did a Fullerton Junior High Teacher Abuse Boys for Years Without Administrators Finding Out?

Melissa Nicole Lindgren looked every bit the eighth-grade-math teacher as she sat behind a table on the morning of Oct. 7, 2016. She wore a modest, baby-blue shirt with neatly rolled-up sleeves, pink-purple eye shadow and bright-red lipstick. Her eyebrows were smartly shaped; her straight brown hair, parted on the side and long outgrown of its layered cut, reached past her shoulders. A hair band squeezed around Lindgren’s wrist, and horn-rimmed glasses rested in front of her.

But the Lakewood native was far from her former classroom at Nicolas Junior High in Fullerton. Lindgren sat in the visitors’ center of Central California Women’s Facility (CCWF) in Chowchilla, the largest ladies prison in the United States.

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The post How Did a Fullerton Junior High Teacher Abuse Boys for Years Without Administrators Finding Out? appeared first on Parent Security Online.

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Guy Reveals Bumble BFF Hack His Wife Is Using To Cheat Without Getting Caught

When dating apps first started to become popular, I was in a longterm relationship. I’ll admit, I was a bit curious as to what was out there. But the overwhelming guilt I felt for just being curious was enough to prevent me from downloading it. There was even a time where an ex dumped me, but we were in the tricky situation where we were still hooking up, I drunkenly downloaded Tinder — and then deleted it after two left swipes because of the soul-crushing guilt. Read More….

The post Guy Reveals Bumble BFF Hack His Wife Is Using To Cheat Without Getting Caught appeared first on Dating Scams 101.

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How to Use Social Media at a Protest Without Big Brother Snooping

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

How to Use Social Media at a Protest Without Big Brother Snooping

IF YOU’RE MARCHING or protesting today, or any day, you may take photos or videos. Maybe some light livestreaming. So long as you’re in public places and aren’t breaking any other laws, that is your legally protected right in the …

The post How to Use Social Media at a Protest Without Big Brother Snooping appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.

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